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Last Updated December 16, 2003

 

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Networking Windows XP

Where to Start

A List of Names That Are Registered by Windows Internet Naming Service 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 314104 - This article describes the names that are are registered by the Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) server.

How to Change a Computer Name or Join a Domain in Windows XP 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 295017 - This article describes the steps to change the name of a computer, join a domain, and add a computer description. 

How to Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 1)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814981 - This article includes Part 1 of the "Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 1 provides an introduction to this guide

How to Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 2)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814982 - This article includes Part 2 of the "Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 2 describes how to connect the cables

How to Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 3)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814983 - This article includes Part 3 of the "Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 3 discusses how to set the computer names and workgroups

How to Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 4)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814984 - This article includes Part 4 of the "Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 4 discusses sharing resources

How to Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 5)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814985 - This article includes Part 5 of the "Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 5 describes how to configure the direct cable connection

How to Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 6)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814986 - This article includes Part 6 of the "Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 6 describes how to configure TCP/IP.

How to Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 7)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814987 - This article includes Part 7 of the "Configure a Direct Cable Connection with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 7 describes how to use NWLink IPX/SPX/NetBIOS compatible transport protocol.

How Domain Controllers Are Located in Windows XP 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 314861 - This article describes the mechanism that Windows XP Professional uses to locate a domain controller in a Windows-based domain.

HOW TO: Configure a VPN Connection to Your Corporate Network in Windows XP Professional 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 305550 - This step-by-step article describes how to configure a VPN connection to your corporate network in Windows XP Professional.

HOW TO: Configure a Wireless Link That Uses Infrared in Windows XP 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 305551 - This step-by-step article describes how to configure a wireless link that uses infrared in Windows XP. Note that you must have an infrared device installed on your computer to complete any of the following procedures. 

How to Connect to Network Resources in Windows XP Without Mapping a Drive or Port 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 311079 - This article explains how to use Universal Naming Convention (UNC) names with My Network Places to connect to network resources without mapping a drive or port.

HOW TO: Create a PPPoE Connection in Windows XP 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 283070 - Microsoft Windows XP includes a built-in PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE) client. This is generally a high speed connection that involves hardware such as a cable modem or DSL.

HOW TO: Determine Which Program Uses or Blocks Specific Transmission Control Protocol Ports Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 281336 - This article discusses how to determine which program uses or blocks specific Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) ports.

How to Disable Media Sense for TCP/IP in Windows 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 239924 - Windows contains the "Media Sensing" feature. You may use this feature on a Windows-based computer using Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) to detect whether or not your network media is in a "link state". A "link state" is defined as the physical media connecting or inserting itself on the network. For example, assuming a 10bt or 100bt physical media, Ethernet network adapters and hubs typically have a "link" light to indicate the current connection status. This is the same condition in which Windows can detect a link. Whenever Windows detects a "down" state on the media, it removes the bound protocols from that adapter until it is detected as "up" again. There may be situations where you may not want your network adapter to detect this state, and you can configure this by editing the registry.

HOW TO: Install NetBEUI on Windows XP 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 301041 - Microsoft has discontinued support for the NetBIOS Extended User Interface (NetBEUI) network protocol in Windows XP. However, it is understandable that migration to another network protocol, such as TCP/IP could involve significant time in planning and testing. Therefore, the NetBEUI protocol has been included on the Windows XP CD-ROM under the VALUEADD directory. This article describes the process for manually installing the unsupported NetBEUI protocol on a computer running Windows XP. The NetBEUI files will need to be manually copied from the Windows XP CD-ROM before NetBEUI will show up in the list of installable network protocols.

HOW TO: Prevent the Network Setup Wizard From Creating a Bridge 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 283429 - This article describes how to prevent the Network Setup Wizard from creating a network bridge. When you run the Network Setup Wizard, the default option is to let the wizard automatically bridge connections.

HOW TO: Rename a Computer with the Netdom.exe Utility 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 298593 - This article describes how to use the Netdom.exe utility (included in Windows XP Support Tools) to rename a computer that is a member of a Windows 2000 or Windows XP domain. This procedure can be performed either locally or remotely on the computer which is being renamed. Also, the procedure does not require you to reset or manually re-create the computer account in the domain. The Netdom.exe utility has the ability to rename a computer that is a member of a Windows XP domain. However, to rename the computer, you must be able to specify the user accounts that have local administrative permissions and the object of the computer account in Active Directory 

How to Reset Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in Windows XP 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 299357 - When viewing the list of components for a network interface, you may notice that the Uninstall button is disabled when Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is selected. In Windows XP, the TCP/IP stack is considered a core component of the operating system; therefore, it is not possible to uninstall TCP/IP in Windows XP. In extreme cases, reinstalling the Internet Protocol stack may be the most appropriate solution. With the NetShell utility, you can now reset the TCP/IP stack back to a pristine state, to the same state as when the operating system was installed 

How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 1)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 813936 - This article includes Part 1 of the "Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 1 discusses how to configure the TCP/IP protocol

How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 2)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 813937 - This article includes Part 2 of the "Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 2 provides information about buying the network hardware

How to Set up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 3)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 813938 - This article includes Part 3 of the "Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 3 discusses how to connect the computers

How to Set up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 4)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 813939 - This article includes Part 4 of the "Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 4 discusses how to install the network card.

How to Set up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 5)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 813940 - This article includes Part 5 of the "Set up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 5 discusses how to configure the TCP/IP protocol

How to Set up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 6)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814003 - This article includes Part 6 of the "Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 6 discusses how to set the computer names and the workgroup

How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 7)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814004 - This article includes Part 7 of the "Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 7 discusses how to share folders

How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (PART 8)
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 814005 - This article includes Part 8 of the "Set up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition" guide. Part 8 discusses how to share a printer

HOW TO: Use the Alternate Configuration Feature for Multiple Network Connectivity 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 283676 - This article describes how to use the Alternate Configuration functionality to establish multiple-network connectivity. If you are a mobile computer user, you can use the Alternate Configuration functionality to maintain seamless operation on both office and home networks without having to manually reconfigure TCP/IP settings. This feature specifies that TCP/IP uses an alternative configuration if a DHCP server is not found. The Alternate Configuration functionality is useful in situations where you use the computer on more than one network, where one of those networks does not have a DHCP server, and you do not want to use an automatic private Internet protocol (IP) addressing configuration.

HOW TO: Use a Handheld PC or a Pocket PC as a Mobile Terminal
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article  314537 - Increasingly, users of wireless mobile devices require access to the functionality of their desktop computers. Windows XP and Windows 2000 permit you to do this. By using the Handheld PC or the Pocket PC, you can connect to an application server and run programs just as if you were sitting at the server computer itself. Connections to application servers can be made across wireless local area networks (LANs), or across the Internet by using virtual private networking (VPN).

Ensuring Great Experiences with NAT Traversal and Universal Plug and Play in Windows XP
Learn how NAT Traversal technology enables network applications to detect the presence of a local NAT device. Source: Microsoft.com 

Using Group Policy Settings with Windows XP Home Networking Features
Group Policy settings to allow the use of ICS, ICF, and Network Bridge are tied to the network to which the computer was connected when the Group Policy settings were applied. Network administrators can define Group Policy settings that restrict or disable networking features that can cause problems with network connectivity and apply to the computer when it is connected to the organization intranet

Windows XP Wireless Deployment Technology and Component Overview
This article explains the elements of wireless LANs, the processes of connection, authentication, and encryption, and the components of secure wireless LANs that are provided with Windows XP and the Windows 2000 Server family.

Troubleshooting Windows XP IEEE 802.11 Wireless Access
This article describes the tools used to troubleshoot a Windows XP wireless client, a wireless access point (AP), and Internet Authentication Service (IAS) and how each tool is used to gather troubleshooting information.

 
How to Troubleshoot Wireless Network Connections in Windows XP  
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 313242 - Windows XP supports 802.11b wireless networking with the Wireless Zero Configuration service. With 802.11b wireless networking, you can enable easy configuration and switching between wireless networks. To use this support, you need a wireless network adapter that is compatible with Windows XP. 

How to Troubleshoot TCP/IP Connectivity with Windows XP 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 314067 - There are utilities that can provide useful information when you are trying to determine the cause of TCP/IP networking problems under Windows XP. This article lists recommendations for using these utilities to diagnose network problems. Al 

HOW TO: Search for a Computer on the Network in Windows XP
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 308887 - This article describes how to search for a computer on a network. If you know the name of the computer, you can access the computer by using the search companion, or you can search for the computer in My Network Neighborhood. 

 
Error Message "Network Name Is No Longer Available" Joining Windows XP Domain
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 
Q293403 - When you join a Windows XP or Windows 2000 Active Directory domain from a Windows XP client, you may receive either of the following error messages: 

"Error 692: Hardware Failure in the Modem" Error Message When You Dial an RAS Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 314846 - When you dial a Remote Access Services (RAS) server in Windows XP, you may receive the following error message as the modem starts to initialize:

Issues in the Installation of Multifunction PCMCIA Cards
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 318213 - When you install a multifunction PCMCIA card that fully implements the PCMCIA multifunction standards by using the system-supplied parent INF file (mf.inf) or any other compatible INF file that does not have override configurations for the
child functions, any of the following installation issues may occur

Many PPPoE Clients from Third-Party Vendors May Not Operate Properly or Be Installed in Windows XP 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 298800 - Many Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) clients from third-party vendors may not operate properly or be installed in Windows XP.

The Perils of UPnP
Learn how UPnP traffic from you XP machines can clog your firewall log and how to eliminate this traffic. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine

VPN Client in Windows XP Disconnects After One Minute
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 331816 - After you install Service Pack 1 (SP1) for Windows XP, your computer may drop virtual private network (VPN) connections after about 55 seconds. 


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