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Last Updated June 04, 2008

 

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Getting Started with Windows Vista

Windows Vista is the most important OS release for Microsoft since Windows 95. Although its been maligned in much of the mainstream press, Vista is more than just a graphic update to Windows XP. It provides important new capabilities in terms of security, reliability, useability, and ease of management that haven't been well promoted. Before making a rush to judgement, take a minute to review some of the technical details about the new OS and what it can mean for your business. 

Overview

Windows Vista Product Guide (Updated for SP1)
The 334 page Windows Vista Product Guide provides a comprehensive overview of the features and functions that make Windows Vista tick. This guide also provides information about the benefits Windows Vista offers diverse users, as well as information about the different editions available.

Paul Thurrott's Windows Vista Activity Center
An index of Paul’s articles, reviews, tips, and walkthroughs of Windows Vista from early Beta’s to the latest Service Packs and add-ons. Source: Paul Thurrott's Supersite for Windows

Windows Vista for the Enterprise
Microsoft’s portal for Vista Enterprise customers. Includes business friendly explanations of Vista’s features and benefits, as well as demos, case studies, and videos. Source: Microsoft.com

Windows Vista Team Blog
The official blog of the Vista development team. Great resource for tips and tricks, new updates, frequently asked questions, and early announcements. Source: WindowsVistaBlog.com

Business Justification
The business case for Windows Vista
A look at the business drivers for and against migrating to Vista, including hardware and software compatibility issues, feature sets, early feedback, deployment considerations, and suggestions on evaluating Windows Vista. Source: SearchWinIT.com

The business case against migrating to Vista
While there are plenty of benefits to using Windows Vista, migration is not without its downsides as well. Expert Bernie Klinder continues his Vista analysis by outlining the reasons you may want to delay your Vista migration. Source: SearchWinIT.com

A hard look at Windows Vista
Five years in the making, Windows Vista has reached its final form at last. It's an ambitious release, from an ambitious company. Source: ComputerWorld

Visual tour: 20 reasons why Windows Vista will be your next OS 
After writing "20 Things You Won't Like About Windows Vista," Scot Finnie admits that there are still plenty of reasons to recommend Microsoft's next-generation operating system. Source: ComputerWorld

Visual tour: 20 things you won't like about Windows Vista
It's time to take a long, hard look at what will become the next version of Windows. Source: ComputerWorld

Vista features that may hurry your migration plans
Much ado has been made about some of Vista's flashier features. Expert Bernie Klinder talks about the ones that really improve end users' experiences. Source: SearchWinIT.com

Vista migration: What IT managers need to consider
After weighing the pros and cons of migrating to Windows Vista, expert Bernie Klinder runs through the final factors IT managers must consider before making the move to the new OS. Source: SearchEnterpriseDesktop.com

Giving Windows Vista a chance
A vote against upgrading to Microsoft Windows Vista can be dangerous for IT shops that don't bother to check out the latest improvements to the operating system. Source: SearchEnterpriseDesktop.com

Technical Details
Windows Vista Product Overview for IT Professionals
The official Microsoft overview of Windows Vista with a focus on features that help improve security, availability, and ease of administration. Source: Microsoft.com

Inside the Windows Vista Kernel
An in depth, three part series by Mark Russinovich which examines the changes to WIndows Vista. Source: Microsoft.com
Part 1 
Part 2 
Part 3 

Going Deep Inside Vista's Kernel architecture
Fascinating Channel 9 Video with Rob Short, the Vice President in charge of the Vista architects team. Source: Channel 9

Microsoft Vista interoperability: What's at stake for IT managers?
For IT managers who are contemplating deploying Windows Vista, perhaps the most critical question at hand is one of interoperability: How well will Windows Vista interoperate within a corporate environment? Will your IT staff be able to deploy Vista clients seamlessly within an existing infrastructure, or will they need to make big changes to Active Directory or other network components to allow Vista clients to participate on the corporate network? Source: SearchWinIT.com

Microsoft Windows Vista: Performance and stability improvements
Check out this excerpt from Microsoft Windows Vista Unleashed by Paul McFedries, with details on performance and stability features for Windows Vista. Source: SearchWinIT.com

Microsoft Windows Vista: What's new under the hood
Check out these excerpts from Microsoft Windows Vista Unleashed by Paul McFedries, with details on the new performance, stability and security features in Windows Vista. Source: SearchEnterpriseDesktop.com

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