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Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003

Installing and configuring Windows Server 2003 is a breeze thanks to new wizards and a much improved plug and play architecture.


Where to Start

Windows Server 2003 System Requirements
Review the table on this page to determine the minimum and recommended system requirements needed to run Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition, Enterprise Edition, Datacenter Edition, and Web Edition

Windows Server 2003 Deployment Guide
Learn all about deploying Windows Server 2003 with this online, pre-release version of the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Deployment Guide. The comprehensive guide includes five books, with many chapters already available online. Source: Microsoft.com

Coexistence of Windows Server 2003 and Windows NT 4.0
This paper describes coexistence of Windows Server 2003 with Windows NT 4.0 in Windows NT 4.0 domains. It addresses upgrading file and print servers, Web application servers, core services such as DNS and DHCP, as well as remote access servers. Source: Microsoft.com

Deploying & Supporting Windows Server 2003
This paper shares what Microsoft©s internal Operations & Technology Group (OTG) Infrastructure Engineering group learned as a result of deploying Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition within Microsoft. OTG is sharing these experiences with customers so that they may use them to help successfully upgrade from Microsoft Windows 2000 to Windows Server 2003. Much of the information also applies to enterprise customers planning to upgrade to Windows Server 2003 from other Microsoft operating systems such as Microsoft Windows NT© version 4.0 Source: Microsoft

Installing Windows Server 2003

How to perform an Unattended Emergency Management Services Installation of Windows Server 2003
This article describes how to perform an unattended Emergency Management Services (also known as EMS) installation of Windows Server 2003. Emergency Management Services is a new feature in Windows Server 2003 that permits you to perform remote management and system recovery tasks when the server is not available by using the standard remote administration tools and mechanisms. Emergency Management Services provides alternative access to a server when the server is not accessible through the standard connection methods, typically a network

Windows Server 2003 Product Activation
The Windows Server 2003 family of retail products contains product activation technology, which means you must activate your copy of Windows Server 2003 before it can be used. Some new servers purchased with Windows Server 2003 pre-installed also require activation. If your organization licenses Windows Server 2003 through one of the Microsoft volume licensing agreement programs, such as Open License, Select License, or Enterprise Agreement, you are not required to activate those licenses

Upgrading Windows Server 2003

Migrating Windows NT Server 4.0 Domains to Windows Server 2003 Active Directory
This white paper provides an overview of the process for upgrading or migrating to the Windows Server 2003 Active Directory© service, outlines some of the basic decisions to be made during the process, and includes a summary of Active Directory best practices. Source: Microsoft.com

Support Webcast: Microsoft Windows Server 2003: Upgrading Domains to Windows Server 2003
Level:300 The goal of this Support WebCast session is to provide a framework for administrators to follow when they upgrade Windows 2000 domain controllers to Windows Server 2003. The topics that will be covered include the pre- and post-upgrade , the introduction of Windows Server 2003 schema upgrades with ADPREP, and a discussion of client interoperability issues leading up the introduction of Windows Server 2003 domain controllers with Winnt32.exe or DCPROMO. Source: Microsoft.co

Support Webcast: Microsoft Windows Server 2003: Upgrading Windows NT 4.0 Domains to Windows Server 2003
Level:200 This WebCast provides a framework to follow when upgrading Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 domain controllers to Windows Server 2003. Hear about pre-upgrade and post-upgrade checks, forest functional level goals, and client interoperability issues. Source: Microsoft.com

Upgrading from Windows 2000
Get an overview of the benefits and process for upgrading to Windows Server 2003 from Windows 2000. This new site section outlines some of the basic decisions to consider whether you are upgrading an existing system, performing a new installation, or carrying out a migration. Source: Microsoft.com

Migrating to Windows 2003 Server

Windows Server 2003 Deployment Guide
Learn all about deploying Windows Server 2003 with this online, pre-release version of the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Deployment Guide. The comprehensive guide includes five books, with many chapters already available online. Source: Microsoft.com

Coexistence of Windows Server 2003 and Windows NT 4.0
This paper describes coexistence of Windows Server 2003 with Windows NT 4.0 in Windows NT 4.0 domains. It addresses upgrading file and print servers, Web application servers, core services such as DNS and DHCP, as well as remote access servers. Source: Microsoft.com

Moving Windows NT 4 and Windows 2000 Applications to Windows Server 2003
This white paper explains how to plan an application migration strategy and describes how you can use various utilities and technical resources to deploy Windows Server 2003 as an application server and Web server. Source: Microsoft.com

Migrating Windows NT Server 4.0 Domains to Windows Server 2003 Active Directory
This white paper provides an overview of the process for upgrading or migrating to the Windows Server 2003 Active Directory© service, outlines some of the basic decisions to be made during the process, and includes a summary of Active Directory best practices. Source: Microsoft.com

Migrating UNIX and Other Applications to Windows Server 2003
This white paper outlines the many system management tools and the advanced development environment that make it easy for IT professionals and developers to migrate UNIX and Java applications to a Windows-based solution. Source: Microsoft.com

Migrating Win32 Applications to Windows Server 2003
This white paper introduces concepts for migrating Microsoft Win32© applications to Windows Server 2003 and the Microsoft .NET Framework. This includes applications such as Microsoft Visual Basic©, 32-bit Windows-based applications, and Web applications written using ASP. Source: Microsoft.com

Support Webcast: Microsoft Windows Server 2003: Upgrading Domains to Windows Server 2003
Level:300 The goal of this Support WebCast session is to provide a framework for administrators to follow when they upgrade Windows 2000 domain controllers to Windows Server 2003. The topics that will be covered include the pre- and post-upgrade , the introduction of Windows Server 2003 schema upgrades with ADPREP, and a discussion of client interoperability issues leading up the introduction of Windows Server 2003 domain controllers with Winnt32.exe or DCPROMO. Source: Microsoft.com

Support Webcast: Microsoft Windows Server 2003: Upgrading Windows NT 4.0 Domains to Windows Server 2003
Level:200 This WebCast provides a framework to follow when upgrading Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 domain controllers to Windows Server 2003. Hear about pre-upgrade and post-upgrade checks, forest functional level goals, and client interoperability issues. Source: Microsoft.com

Upgrading from Windows 2000
Get an overview of the benefits and process for upgrading to Windows Server 2003 from Windows 2000. This new site section outlines some of the basic decisions to consider whether you are upgrading an existing system, performing a new installation, or carrying out a migration. Source: Microsoft.com

Using the Application Compatibility Toolkit
Application compatibility affects planning, deployment, and future support of the new computing environment. This article explains tools for testing applications during both the development and deployment phases. Source: Microsoft.com

Migrating Applications

Moving Windows NT 4 and Windows 2000 Applications to Windows Server 2003
This white paper explains how to plan an application migration strategy and describes how you can use various utilities and technical resources to deploy Windows Server 2003 as an application server and Web server. Source: Microsoft.com

Migrating UNIX and Other Applications to Windows Server 2003
This white paper outlines the many system management tools and the advanced development environment that make it easy for IT professionals and developers to migrate UNIX and Java applications to a Windows-based solution. Source: Microsoft.com

Migrating Win32 Applications to Windows Server 2003
This white paper introduces concepts for migrating Microsoft Win32© applications to Windows Server 2003 and the Microsoft .NET Framework. This includes applications such as Microsoft Visual Basic©, 32-bit Windows-based applications, and Web applications written using ASP. Source: Microsoft.com

Using the Application Compatibility Toolkit
Application compatibility affects planning, deployment, and future support of the new computing environment. This article explains tools for testing applications during both the development and deployment phases. Source: Microsoft.com

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