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Last Updated December 10, 2003

Disk Management
  Where to Start
  Defragmentation
  Disk Drives
  Disk Management
  Disk Recovery
  Dynamic Disks
  File Systems
  RAID
  Remote Storage
  Removable Storage
  Storage (SANS)
  Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting
  Where to Start

  General Guides
  Boot.ini files
  Error Codes
  Event Logging
  How to Guides
  Memory Dumps
  Memory Leaks
  Performance Tuning
  Recovery Console
  Win2k Install Bugs
  WinNT Upgrade Bugs
  Win9x Upgrade Bugs

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting Disk Related Issues

There are a number of issues that can occur when configuring disk management in Windows 2000. Some are outright bugs in the code, a few are the result of hardware incompatibilities, and the rest are simply limitations of the disk management features. We've tried to make this area as complete as possible, and will update it frequently as new issues are posted on Microsoft's Knowledge Base.

Where to Start

1024 Cylinder Limit, How Windows NT Gets Drive Geometry
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 98080 - Windows NT can take advantage of hard drives with more than 1024 cylinders if your computer hardware permits. While Windows NT does not have an internal limit to the number of cylinders it can address, there are some hardware configurations where Windows NT must contend with a 10 bit (1024 cylinder) limitation, imposed by the supporting hardware (the hard drive controller or system BIOS in most cases). 

Disk Performance May Degrade Over Time
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263939 - Disk input/output (I/O) throughput may degrade over time from the amount of time that it takes after you start your computer. After the throughput is degraded, the original disk performance is not recovered until you restart your computer again. that this degradation in performance is distinct from the degradation that occurs when a disk becomes fragmented. Degraded performance that is caused by disk fragmentation is not recovered when you restart the computer. Also, this degradation in performance is observed most often on high-end disk subsystems that consist of multiple spindles in a Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) configuration

Disk Replacement for Windows 2000 Server Cluster
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 224075 - It can be costly to make mistakes while replacing a cluster disk; the consequences can be irrecoverable loss of all the data on that disk. If the disk is the quorum disk, the cluster's configuration data is at risk.

Drive Letter Changes After You Restart Your Computer
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 325040 - When you shutdown, and then restart your computer, you may experience one of the following symptoms: The computer may intermittently not restart Windows. Instead, the start-up sequence may select a drive that is different from the typical drive to start the computer. When this problem occurs, you may receive the following error message:
Windows 2000 could not start because of a computer disk hardware configuration problem. Could not read from selected boot disk. Check boot path and disk hardware. Please check the Windows documentation about hardware disk configuration and your hardware disk configuration and your hardware reference manuals for additional information

Drive List Does Not Show All Available Drives
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 280499 - When you click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, double-click Fonts, and then click Install New Fonts on the File menu, the Drives box in the Add Fonts dialog box may show only drive C. 

Hard drive failure
While manufacturers would like you to believe hard drive failures are a rare event, the reality is quite different. When Survey.com polled 1,293 IT staff and business executives, the majority had experienced computer downtime in the previous year due to disk drive failure. Also, 30.3 percent of the time the computer was down for more than 24 hours. Storage explosions, unsinkable drives and disk crashes © hard drive reliability still leaves a lot to be desired. What can you do about it? Source: ServerWorld

How to Locate and Correct Disk Space Problems on NTFS Volumes 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 303079 - The NTFS file system supports many volume and file-level features that may lead to what appears to be lost or misreported free disk space. This behavior may be apparent when an NTFS volume suddenly becomes very full for no reason, and yet a...

How to Perform Scandisk in Windows 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 156571 - After you install Windows, the scandisk command is not displayed in the System tools folder.

How to Recover Mirroring Windows NT Using IDE Devices 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 141702 - This article provides the steps necessary to recover mirroring using IDE devices under Windows NT. Use this article in conjunction with the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base, which explains how to create an Windows NT Tolerant Boot Disk

Recovering from Failed System Drive with Non-Default %SystemRoot% Folder
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 235478 - When you install Windows 2000 by booting from either the Windows 2000 installation CD-ROM or the four Setup floppy disks, Setup does not prompt you for or allow you to change the target installation folder name. The default installation folder is C:\WINNT. 

Repairing the Master Boot Record
One of the most important parts of your system's hard disk is the Master Boot Record (MBR). Without a valid MBR, it's impossible to boot the system from the hard disk. Source: EarthWeb

Some SCSI Adapter Drivers Previously Included in Windows NT 4.0 Are Unavailable in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 228104 - There are several Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) adapter drivers that have been removed from Windows 2000 that were previously included in Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 and 3.51. If you are using one of the SCSI adapters listed later in...

The Tech Page
An online database that holds jumpers and specs for thousands of hard drives from hundreds of manufacturers. Also includes low level format and other hard drive utilities, and a free discussion forum.

Using Norton Disk Edit to Backup Your Master Boot Record
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 166997 - The master boot record is required to boot your computer. Having a current backup of your master boot record is an excellent way to ensure that, in the event of a virus or hardware failure, you will be able to recover your system in the shortest amount of time possible 

Windows NT Partitioning Rules During Setup
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 138364 During the installation of Windows NT, Setup determines the best partitioning scheme to use based on the existing partition table entries and where you choose to install Windows NT. Windows NT Setup restraints restrict the boot partition 

Windows NT Setup: SCSI Boot Disk Size Limitations
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 127134 When you attempt to install Windows NT on a computer with a large SCSI boot disk, Windows NT Setup may not recognize the primary active partition. 

Known Bugs and Issues 

ARC Path to Windows NT System Files Changes
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 102877 - When you are using Disk Administrator in Windows NT or the Disk Management Console in Windows 2000 to create new partitions on a hard disk drive that has Windows NT on it, under certain circumstances, the Advanced RISC Computing (ARC) path to the Windows NT files changes. When this happens, a dialog box appears when you exit Disk Administrator warning that the Boot.ini needs to be changed to reflect the new path. You need to edit the Boot.ini file before clicking OK because the next option restarts the system. In Windows 2000, you will receive a message before you create the partition indicating that the partition number will change and that the Boot.ini must be modified. After the partition is created another message will tell you the current partition number and the value to which it must be changed. In Windows 2000 it is not necessary to make the changes prior to clicking OK because the system will not restart automatically at this time, however you must make the changes to the Boot.ini prior to restarting. 

Cannot Change Stripe Size on Striped and RAID-5 Volumes
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 223189 - The Windows 2000 Disk Management tool does not provide the ability to change the stripe size on striped (RAID-0) and RAID-5 volumes. 

Cannot Convert FAT32 to NTFS with IDE Drive Larger Than 20 GB 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 271644 - If you install Windows 2000 from a CD-ROM to a 20-gigabyte (GB) hard disk that uses the FAT32 file system, the installation succeeds. However, when you attempt to convert the file system to the NTFS file system by using the convert c: /fs:ntfs command, the conversion may not succeed.

Cannot Create Partition Greater than 1 GB during NT setup
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 137474 - When you attempt to install Windows NT on a computer with some SCSI controllers, using two or more drives containing free space, Windows NT does not allow creation of partition sizes larger than 1 gigabyte (GB). 

Cannot Install Windows 2000 on a Non-System or Boot Dynamic Volume 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 216341 - When you install Windows 2000 on a dynamic volume, you can install only on a dynamic volume that is a boot or system volume. Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 and earlier versions do not support dynamic volumes with third-party software, so this is not an issue with earlier operating systems.

Cannot Remove False System Partition Using Disk Management
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 245799 - When you view partitions in the Disk Management tool, 2 separate volumes (such as drive C and D) may be listed as the "system" partition. Your original dynamic system disk may be listed as "Missing" - "Offline", and you may be unable to delete this "fake" system volume. If you try to delete the false system volume, you may receive the following error message: Cannot delete the system volume on this disk. If you try to remove the system volume status by re-formatting that partition, you may receive the following warning message: This volume is no longer the current system volume. All data on this volume will be lost. Are you sure you want to format this volume ? 

Changing Active Partition Can Make Your System Unbootable
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 228004 - When you use the Windows 2000 Disk Management snap-in tool to mark your primary partition as active, the computer may not start up if the partition marked as active does not contain the Windows 2000 boot files 

Chkdsk Does Not Use Backup Boot Sector to Fix Corrupted FAT32 Boot Sector
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 247575 - If a FAT32 volume becomes corrupted or inaccessible and you attempt to repair the volume using the Chkdsk tool (Chkdsk.exe), the file system may be reported correctly as FAT32 (or possibly as RAW, depending on the damage), but the Chkdsk tool immediately quits without making repairs.

Computer with Large Number of Partitions Starts Slowly 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 274349 - When you start your computer and it has a large number of partitions defined in the Disk Management MMC snap-in, startup may take an excessively long time to complete. Your computer may appear to stop responding (hang) while the "Starting Windows 2000" message is displayed, and the status bar may pause between 50 and 70 percent. 

Device Manager Prints an Incorrect Total/Free Disk Size in the Resource Summary Report 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 318690 - When you print the Resource Summary report by using Device Manager, the total and free disk sizes may be incorrect for some of the disk drives. If your disk drive partition is larger than 4 gigabytes (GB), the printed report may show the incorrect total and free size for that disk. If the disk partition is smaller than 4 GB, the printed report shows the correct total and free size for that disk 

Disk Manager Does Not Display Graphical View in Bottom Pane at High Resolution
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 264402 - When you start the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in, no graphical view of the computer drive partitions is displayed.

Disk Manager Prompts You to Continue Every Five Minutes
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 273988 - If your computer has many hard disks, Disk Manager may take a long time to start. During this time, you receive the following message approximately every five minutes and Disk Manager pauses drive enumeration until you click OK: Local Disk manager not receiving connections. Do you wish to continue?  

Disk Management Snap-In Crashes If You Delete Fault-Tolerant Volume While It Is Still Building
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 254104 - If you attempt to delete a fault-tolerant volume in the Disk Management snap-in while the volume is still building, the Disk Management snap-in may close unexpectedly (crash) or stop responding (hang).

Disk Management Snap-in Displays Red X for Volumes Spanning Multiple Physical Disks
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 295577 - Volumes that span multiple physical disks may incorrectly be marked as being in error when you view them in the Disk Management snap-in. However, those volumes contain no errors and you can access data on them successfully. This problem occurs randomly, and the problem may not reoccur if you quit the snap-in and then start it again.

Disk Performance May Degrade Over Time 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263939 - Disk input/output (I/O) throughput may degrade over time from the amount of time that it takes after you start your computer. After the throughput is degraded, the original disk performance is not recovered until you restart your computer again. Note that this degradation in performance is distinct from the degradation that occurs when a disk becomes fragmented. Degraded performance that is caused by disk fragmentation is not recovered when you restart the computer. Also, this degradation in performance is observed most often on high-end disk subsystems that consist of multiple spindles in a Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) configuration 

Drive Letter Not Visible After Assignment Change or Moving Disk Resource
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 232276 - You may experience one of the following symptoms: 1) When you use the Disk Management snap-in to change a drive letter on your Windows 2000-based server from your remote Terminal Server client computer, the drive letter change may not be immediately visible. 2) When you view a Cluster Server from a remote Terminal Server client computer and a failover occurs, you may not be able to access the drive letter or a question mark (?) may be displayed over the letter. 3) When you attempt to create or remove partitions using the Disk Management snap-in and one of the following occurs: The properties of the new parition report 0 bytes, or the label of the new partition as viewed in the drive properties is inaccurate. This problem can occur if you make this drive letter change, but do not then log off and log on again.

Drives Created with the Subst Command Are Not Connected
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 269163 - If you create a drive using the subst command, when you open My Computer, the drive is displayed as a disconnected network drive (the icon contains a red "X"). 

Drive Letters Assigned to Unsupported Partition Types
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 221799 - After you upgrade to Windows 2000, drive letters may be assigned to partitions that previously did not have drive letters. When you try to gain access to one of the partitions, you may receive the following error message: The volume does not contain a recognized file system. Please make sure that all required file system drivers are loaded and that the volume is not corrupted. When you view the Logical Disk Manager (LDM) snap-in, the partition has a status of "healthy" but does not have a file system type. 

Err Msg: CHKDSK Detected Minor Inconsistencies on the Drive...
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 109524 - In Windows NT, if you check your hard disk drive with CHKDSK in Read Only mode and it has files currently open or in use by Windows NT, one of the following error messages may appear:

Error Message "Cannot Proceed with the Upgrade" When a Basic Disk Is Converted to Dynamic
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 267146 - When you use Microsoft Windows 2000 Disk Management to upgrade a basic disk to dynamic, the disk conversion process may stop and you may receive the following error message: [Disk Management] Cannot proceed with the upgrade. Unable to get information about an existing basic volume.  

Error Message Copying Large Amounts of Data from an Offline Drive
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 262554 - You may receive an error message or a blue screen when a program calls the Win32 API GetFileInformationByHandle for a file residing on an offline drive. This generally occurs when you are copying data to or from an offline drive (that is, a drive which is configured for Client-Side Caching or CSC).

Error Message: Logical Disk Manager: Volume Is Open or in Use. Request Can Not Be Completed
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 281393 - When you try to add volumes or partitions to a Windows 2000-based computer, you may receive the following error message: Logical Disk Manager: Volume is open or in use. Request can not be completed. After you receive this error message, the partition appears to have a "healthy" status, but the file system type and partition name are missing. 

Error Message "Volume Is Open or in Use" When You Create Volumes by Using the Create Partition Wizard
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 277824 - When you attempt to create a volume on a hard disk by using the Create Partition Wizard in the Disk Management snap-in and you format the volume for the NTFS file system, you may receive the following error message: Volume is open or in use. Request cannot be completed. When you close the dialog boxes, you can successfully format the volume or volumes.

Error Message: Windows 2000 Could Not Start Because of a Computer Disk Hardware Configuration Problem
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 297523 - During an upgrade from Microsoft Windows 98 to Windows 2000, you may receive the following error message:
Windows 2000 could not start because of a computer disk hardware configuration problem. Could not read from the selected boot disk. Check boot path and disk hardware. Please check the Windows 2000(TM) documentation about hardware disk configuration and your hardware reference manuals for additional information. During Setup, after the computer restarts, you may receive the following error message: STOP 0x0000001e Kmode_Exception_Not_Handled......setupdd.sys

Disk Error 11 and ATAPI Error 5 Using DMA Transfer Mode for ATA66 Hard Disk
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 262448 - If you are using DMA transfer mode with an ATA66 hard disk, you may receive the following error messages at startup:

Disk Manager Does Not Display Graphical View in Bottom Pane at High Resolution
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 264402 - When you start the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in, no graphical view of the computer drive partitions is displayed.

Disk Management Cannot Create or Delete Partitions on Removable Storage Media
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 254109 - This article describes why you cannot use Disk Management to create or delete partitions on removable storage media.

Disk Management Snap-In Crashes If You Delete Fault-Tolerant Volume While It Is Still Building
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 254104 - If you attempt to delete a fault-tolerant volume in the Disk Management snap-in while the volume is still building, the Disk Management snap-in may close unexpectedly (crash) or stop responding (hang).

DOS FDISK program sees NTFS partitions as HPFS
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article :Q150315 - The FDISK program from MS-DOS 6.22 can remove Windows NT file system (NTFS) partitions on hard disk drives. However it, identifies these partitions as HPFS. 

Drive Letters Automatically Assigned to Unrecognizable Partitions
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 266647 - Windows 2000 automatically assigns drive letters to all partitions, including partitions that are in raw format (partitions that have not been formatted). This can cause a problem if there are many partitions because Windows 2000 may run out of drive letters to assign. Some programs use raw partitions; assigning drive letters in this case is not required or appropriate.

Drive Letter Not Visible After Assignment Change or Moving Disk Resource
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 232276 - You may experience one of the following symptoms: When you use the Disk Management snap-in to change a drive letter on your Windows 2000-based server from your remote Terminal Server client computer, the drive letter change may not be immediately visible.

Dynamic Volumes Are Not Displayed Accurately in Text-Mode Setup or Recovery Console
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 227364 - While you are using the Recovery console to repair an unbootable Windows 2000 system, or during the text-mode portion of Windows 2000 Setup, dynamic disks may not display accurate information about the correct sizes or the complete list of volumes contained on the dynamic disk(s). There is also no visible designation as to whether a disk is a basic or dynamic disk. 

Explorer.exe Still Shows Files on a Mounted Volume After Being Deleted
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 272061 - If you are a member of the Administrators group, you can use Disk Management or the 

Files May Be Damaged During Windows 2000 Setup on Fujitsu MPG3102AT or Fujitsu MPG3204AT Hard Disks 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 311902 - When you try to install Windows 2000 on either a Fujitsu MPG3102AT or Fujitsu MPG3204AT hard disk on a computer that has the Intel 815 chipset, the installation procedure does not report damaged files after Setup copies the initial files and restarts the computer.

File Replication Does Not Work As You Expect When You Configure Disk Quotas
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 816945 - When you enable disk quotas in a domain where a domain-based Microsoft Distributed File System (DFS) topology with automatic replication is configured, you may experience one or both of the following symptoms: Files are not replicated. Inconsistent replicas are generated.

Hard Disk Is Misreported as Eight Gigabytes in Size During Setup
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 254769 - During the Text-mode portion of Setup, some Integrated Device Electronics (IDE) drives are reported as being only 8 gigabytes (GB) in size. This behavior can occur with any IDE hard disk that is larger than 8.4 GB in size

Hard Disk Problems Cause Error Messages When You Start Your Computer
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 812446 - When you start your computer, you may receive an error message that is similar to the following: Hard disk drive failure When you start your computer from a Microsoft Windows 98 Startup disk, and then try to use the Fdisk.exe program to view partition information, you may receive the following error message: No fixed disk present

"Internal Error - Disk Group Exists and Is Imported" Error Message While Importing Foreign Disk
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 260113 - When you use Windows 2000 Disk Management to import dynamic disks that are displayed as foreign disks, you may receive the following error message: 

Logical Disk Names Are Displayed in System Monitor Instead of Drive Letters 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 274311 - After you convert a hard disk from Basic to Dynamic, the volumes on that hard disk are not identified by their drive letter in System Monitor.

Logical Disk Partitions Are Lost or Damaged After You Upgrade from Windows NT 4.0 to Windows 2000 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323231 - When you use Windows 2000 Disk Management to try to create or delete a logical drive in an extended partition after you upgrade from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Windows 2000, you may receive the following error message: The Server Threw an Exception... 

Logical Drives Created Under Windows 2000 Not Displayed in Windows NT and Windows 95/98 Dual Boot Systems
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 254108 - When you create logical drives in an extended partition in Microsoft Windows 2000, you cannot view those drives from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 or Microsoft Windows 95 or 98 in a dual-boot system. Or, when you view a Cluster Server from a remote Terminal Server client computer and a failover occurs, you may not be able to access the drive letter or a question mark (?) may be displayed over the letter. 

Mirrored Drives Larger Than 137 GB Perform Slowly 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 314695 - Using 48-bit Logical Block Addressing (LBA) support (per ATA/ATAPI-6) permits hard disks to be larger than 137 gigabytes (GB) in size. When 48-bit LBA support is turned on for ATA Packet Interface (ATAPI) drives in a RAID 1 (mirroring) configuration, performance is noticeably reduced.

Multiple-Path Software May Cause Disk Signature to Change
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 293778 - The disk signature and Global Unique Identifier (GUID) for a disk may change unexpectedly on computers that have redundant Host Bus Adapters (HBA) to a common external disk. In this case, programs that are dependent on these disk signatures in the master boot record (MBR) may fail.

Multiple Unpartitioned Spaces Displayed During Windows 2000 Setup
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 228182 - During the text portion of Windows 2000 Setup, multiple unpartitioned spaces may appear on a single hard disk. When this occurs, it may appear that it is not possible to use all the available unpartitioned space on the disk in a single partition.

Non-Administrative User Cannot Access Removable Media After NTFS Format
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 269013 - When a non-administrative user tries to access removable media after formatting an NTFS drive, access is denied. This occurs after the administrator applies the "Allowed to eject removable NTFS media" policy to allow administrators and interactive users to eject and format the removable media. 

Non-Administrator Cannot Gain Access to Removable Media
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 268236 - When a non-administrative user attempts to gain access to removable media, the user may receive an "Access denied" error message. This behavior occurs after an administrator applies the "Allowed to eject removable NTFS media" policy 

Operating System Does Not Recognize That the Secondary Channel Has Been Disabled
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 272586 - When you run Windows 2000 on a computer that is using a VIA Integrated Device Electronics (IDE) controller chipset, if you disable the secondary channel in the BIOS, the operating system does not recognize that the secondary is disabled. As a result, Device Manager continues to report that the second channel is enabled and an interrupt is allocated to the channel, even though the devices on the channel are not recognized by the operating system. 

Paging File Functionality Requires System Account Permissions and Proper Size
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 259151 - When you modify the NTFS permissions in Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.0, the System account may be inadvertently removed from the partition. This leaves the System account without the ability to manage some system resources such as the paging file. 

Pool Damage from Ntfs.sys When Quotas Are Used on a Mounted Volume
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 285799 - When you are using mount points and quotas on the same volume, you may receive random error messages on a blue screen. This problem only happens when the path to the mount point is greater than 20 characters and the option to log an event when a user exceeds their quota limit or warning level is enabled.

Possible Data Loss After You Enable "Write Cache Enabled" Feature
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 281672 - When you enable write caching on disk drives, it may work correctly the first time you shut down your computer, but it may not work correctly on subsequent shutdowns. When this problem occurs, you may experience data loss. 

Problem with DiskPart Assigning Drive Letters
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 811980 - When you use the DiskPart text-mode command interpreter create vol command to create virtual drives on a dynamic disk, a drive letter is automatically assigned to each volume that is created. When you create many virtual drives, you may receive an error message when all 26 drive letters have been used. When you are creating virtual drives by using a script file with DiskPart, issue the remove command to remove the associated drive letter and to prevent this error condition.

Problems Managing EISA Partition on Dynamic Disks
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 242168 - After you upgrade a basic disk containing an Extended Industry Standard Architecture (EISA) partition to a dynamic disk, the partition is not displayed in the proper location and cannot be managed in the Disk Management snap-in (LDM) in Microsoft Management Console (MMC). 

Random Problems Encountered When Mixing SE and LVD SCSI Standards
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 285013 - Several problems may occur when you mix SCSI drive types of Single Ended (SE), and Low Voltage Differential (LVD), such as by placing SE- and LVD-based drives on the same SCSI bus. The symptoms include, but are not limited to, the computer not starting, error messages appearing on a blue screen, and drives becoming unstable, or damaged. 

Reasons Why Windows NT Does Not Boot From a Shadow Mirror Drive 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 167045 - Microsoft Windows NT supports Disk Mirroring and Disk Duplexing of the operating system partition. This article is intended to help clarify why the shadow drive does not always boot and how to ensure that it will boot in the case of a primary disk failure. The most common symptom when trying to boot from the shadow drive is that the system will hang after POST with a blinking cursor and no boot menu options are displayed. 

Recovering from Failed System Drive with Non-Default %SystemRoot% Folder
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 235478 - When you install Windows 2000 by booting from either the Windows 2000 installation CD-ROM or the four Setup floppy disks, Setup does not prompt you for or allow you to change the target installation folder name. The default installation folder is \WINNT 

Re-enabled LS-120 Drive Requires Shutdown and Restart
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 227244 - When you re-enable a disabled integrated device electronics-based (IDE-based) LS-120 disk drive in Device Manager, the drive may not be accessible either in Windows Explorer or from a command prompt. 

Setup Cannot Continue After Reformatting Dynamic System/Boot Partition
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 246119 - After you reformat the system/boot partition on a dynamic disk during Text-mode Setup and the file-copy portion of Setup finishes, you may experience any of the following symptoms when Setup reboots the computer to start GUI-mode Setup 

Slow Performance Accessing Local Drives with Share Name 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 278678 - If you share folders on a local computer and then access these local file systems by using their share names, transferring files may be much slower than when you use local drive and path names. 

Slow Performance Writing to Disk and Temporary Files Stay Open 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 262326 - When messages write to the %TEMP% folder and the process creates files that have hexadecimal numbers in their file names, the hard disk's input and output rate increases, causing slow performance over time. The temporary flag also keeps the temporary open. This behavior occurs when Exchange 2000 Server runs on Windows 2000 Server.

Small SCSI Disk May Seem to Have Zero Cylinders in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258281 - Programs that retrieve disk geometry information may show that very small SCSI disks have zero cylinders. If such a disk does not already have a signature, you cannot perform operations on the disk by using Logical Disk Manager. 

Small Disk Partitions May Not Work as a Basic Disk 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 291588 - Programs that retrieve disk geometry information may show that very small SCSI disks have one cylinder. Such a disk may not work as a basic disk, and you cannot perform operations on such a disk by using Logical Disk Manager. Also, the disk properties show the size of the disk as zero bytes. If you upgrade the disk from a basic disk to a dynamic disk, the disk may work correctly and show the correct disk size

Startup Problems When Transferring System Hard Disk to a Backup Computer
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 268066 - A Microsoft Windows NT-based or Microsoft Windows 2000-based server may not start up if its system hard disk is transferred to another computer that is a different model. For example, a user may transfer a system hard disk to a backup computer 

Stop 0x58 Error Message Booting to a Shadow Drive from a Broken Basic Mirror
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 224199 - Unlike previous versions of Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000 provides the ability to upgrade a Windows NT server that has the operating system disk software mirrored without first breaking the mirror. 

Support for ATA 100 (Mode 5 ) in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 260233 - Windows 2000 does not support ATA-100 (Mode 5) for IDE hard disks. All ATA-100 IDE hard disks that are used with Windows 2000 default to ATA-66 (Mode 4).

System Monitor Displays Incorrect Volume Size When Disk Is Mounted But Not Assigned a Drive Letter
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 260834 - When a volume is mounted but is not assigned a driver letter, the wrong amount of free space is displayed in System Monitor. 

System or Boot Disk Listed as Dynamic Unreadable in Disk Management
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 236086 - When you view your system disk or boot disk in the Disk Management tool, it may be listed as "dynamic unreadable", and you may be unable to use the Disk Management tool to manage this disk. Note that this behavior may occur even though the operating system is currently running from your system disk or boot disk. Your original dynamic system disk or boot disk may now be listed as "Missing" - "Offline", and all volumes contained on the missing disk are noted as "failed" and are not accessible. If you then try to reactivate the missing disk, you may receive the following error message: The specified disk could not be located (updated 4/25/2000)

The Hard Disk Label May Be Garbled in My Computer 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 227548 - If you upgrade a Microsoft Windows 98-based computer that is configured to use the Greek language (code page 737) to Windows 2000 with Greek language settings, the hard disk labels in My Computer that contained Greek characters may not be displayed 

The Physical Disk Is Displayed with the Drive Letter Enumerated in System Monitor 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 267842 - In Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 and earlier, logical disk and physical disk counters are displayed as separate items in Performance Monitor whereas in Windows 2000, these objects are displayed as merged objects in System Monitor.
 

Unable to Log on if the Boot Partition Drive Letter Has Changed
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 249321 - After you try to log on to your Windows 2000-based computer by using a valid user name and password, the the Loading your personal settings dialog box is displayed, followed by the Saving your settings dialog box. However, the desktop does not appear, and the Welcome to Windows logon screen is displayed again. 

Windows 2000 Cannot Access Windows NT 4.0 Disk Array
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 246150 - If you are dual-booting Windows 2000 with Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, you may not be able to access stripe or volume sets that you created in Windows NT 4.0 after you install Windows 2000. 

Windows 2000 Chkdsk Reports Cleaning Unused Security Descriptors
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 246882 - If you run the Chkdsk.exe tool with no command-line switches against a Windows NT file system (NTFS) volume, Chkdsk.exe may report that problems were found, and suggest that you run the Chkdsk command with the /f switch to fix the volume. 

Windows 2000 Is Unable to Read Factory-Formatted Zip Cartridges in Floppy Mode
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 255527 - When you insert a Zip cartridge into the drive, Windows 2000 is unable to mount or read the volume, and the drive is shown as being unallocated in the Disk Management snap-in. 

Windows 2000 Setup Does Not Allow Selection of Partition Type
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 227707 - When you create a partition on your hard disk during Windows 2000 Setup, you are not allowed to select the type of partition to create (primary or extended). 

Windows 2000 Starts Slowly After Modifying SMART Drive Parameters
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 259545 - Windows 2000 may spend between 1.5 and 4.5 seconds querying each drive at startup. You see the drive activity light during this time. This delay is most obvious on computers that have many drives; the boot sequence is delayed until each drive.

Windows Hangs at "Loading Machine Info" with HighPoint UltraDMA ATA/66 Controller
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 243018 - If you start your computer using a Windows 2000 CD-ROM to install Windows and you have installed a HighPoint UltraDMA ATA/66 hard disk controller, the computer may stop responding (hang) while the following information is displayed: Loading Machine Information. You cannot press F6 to install a secondary controller driver. If you upgrade from Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 95/98, you may receive the following error message: Stop 0x0000007b INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE  

Windows NT Does Not Boot to a Partition That Starts More Than 4 GB into Disk
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 197295 X86-based computers running Windows NT do not start if the "multi()" syntax is used in the Boot.ini file and the first sector of the partition to which Windows NT is installed is 4 GB or more into the disk. 

Windows NT Does Not Start If Primary Partition Is Above 2 GB
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 192104 While you install Windows NT, your computer may stop responding (hang) at the Power On Self Test (POST) screen (after the text-mode portion of Setup is complete) without displaying an error message. 

Write Caching Settings for Hard Disk May Not Persist After You Restart Your Computer
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 290757 - When you change the write cache settings for the hard disk, these settings may not persist after you restart your computer. When you restart the computer, the Write caching enabled setting may always be enabled. 

 

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