LabMice.net - The Windows 2000\XP\.NET Resource Index
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Last Updated December 10, 2003

Disk Management
  Where to Start
  Defragmentation
  Disk Drives
  Disk Management
  Disk Recovery
  Dynamic Disks
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  Remote Storage
  Removable Storage
  Storage (SANS)
  Troubleshooting

 

 

 

 

 

Windows 2000 Disk Management

Where to Start

HOW TO: Manage Disk Capacity and Usage By Using Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 300979 - This step-by-step article is intended for users that manage Windows 2000 file servers. This includes the responsibility for controlling the amount of disk space that other users are given to store files on the server.

Inside Storage Management Part 1
Great article by Mark Russinovich on how Windows NT/2000 manages disks. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (March 2000)

Inside Storage Management, Part 2
Storage architecture in Win2K has changed dramatically from NT 4.0, supporting the creation of advanced volumes and dynamic growth of existing volumes without reboots. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (April 2000)

Windows 2000 Disk Management
Win2K's disk-management tool is easier to use than NT 4.0's, and it has some handy new features. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (Feb 2000)

Windows NT Partitioning Rules During Setup
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 138364 During the installation of Windows NT, Setup determines the best partitioning scheme to use based on the existing partition table entries and where you choose to install Windows NT. Windows NT Setup restraints restrict the boot partition

Windows NT Setup: SCSI Boot Disk Size Limitations
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 127134 When you attempt to install Windows NT on a computer with a large SCSI boot disk, Windows NT Setup may not recognize the primary active partition. 

How to articles

Description of Disk Groups in Windows 2000 Disk Management
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 222189. Describes Dynamic Disks and Disk Groups in Windows 2000.

How to Change the System/Boot Drive Letter in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 223188 Describes how to change the system or boot drive letter in Windows 2000. For the most part, this is not recommended, especially if the drive letter is the same as when Windows 2000 was installed. The only time that you may want to do this is when the drive letters get changed without any user intervention. This may happen when you break a mirror volume or there is a drive configuration change. This should be a rare occurrence and you should change the drive letters back to match the initial installation. 

How to Enable Disk Quotas in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 183322 Describes how to enable disk quotas in Windows 2000.

HOW TO: Enable UDMA66 Mode on Intel Chipsets
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 247951 - By default, the UDMA66 mode is disabled on a Windows computer with a Intel chipset that supports UDMA66. This is by design.

How to Manually Enable/Disable Disk Write Caching
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 259716 - Some third-party programs require disk write caching to be enabled or disabled. In addition, enabling disk write caching may increase operating system performance. This article describes how to enable or disable disk write caching. 

How to Extend the Disk Space of an Existing Shared Disk with Windows Clustering
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263590 - This article discusses how to extend the disk space of a hardware-defined disk with Windows Clustering. If you add additional space to an existing cluster server disk at the hardware level, you must perform additional steps to ensure that the computer system recognizes this additional disk space. 

How to Format an Existing Partition on a Shared Cluster Hard Disk
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 257937 - This article describes how to format an existing hard disk or partition on a shared cluster hard disk or partition. You may need to do this if there is NTFS file system damage on a cluster hard disk resource that the chkdsk command cannot repair, or if you want to reformat a partition to start with a known good file system state and known good data. To do this, you may need to format one or all of the existing shared hard disks, including the quorum hard disk. In Windows 2000, if a program or service has an open file, you cannot format the hard disk on which the file is open. You cannot format the quorum hard disk when the Cluster service is running.

How to Manually Enable/Disable Disk Write Caching
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 259716 - Some third-party programs require disk write caching to be enabled or disabled. In addition, enabling disk write caching may increase operating system performance. This article describes how to enable or disable disk write caching.

How to Overcome 4,095-MB Paging File Size Limit in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 237740. When you are setting the paging file size in Windows 2000, the documentation states that the largest paging file you can select is 4,095 megabytes (MB). This is the limit set per volume; you can actually create paging files this large on one or more drives. 

How to Use Diskpart.exe to Extend a Data Volume
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 325590 -
This article describes how to use the Diskpart.exe command-line utility to extend a data volume into unallocated space. 

Moving Windows NT Basic Disk FT Sets to a Windows 2000 Computer
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 253110 - When you upgrade a computer from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Windows 2000 and that computer contains fault tolerant Disk sets (FT sets - Stripe Sets with Parity, Stripe Sets, Volume Sets and Mirrors), Setup automatically migrates the FT set 

 

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