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">Last Updated December 10, 2003

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Windows 2000 Deployment Pitfalls

Smart managers learn from their mistakes. Successful managers learn from the mistakes of others and avoid them entirely. We will do our best to hunt down and collect as many bug reports, known migration issues, and deployment pitfall that is published and list them here. You may also want to check our index of Media Opinions, a collection of 3rd party and Industry media views at how Windows 2000 migrations are fairing.
 
DNS Migration in a mixed environment
Windows NT Magazine looks at some of the issues that companies operating in a mixed environment with NT, UNIX, Novell, and the like will face as they migrate to Windows 2000. Source:  Windows NT Magazine (Nov 1999)

Hardware, application compatibility are critical Windows 2000 planning and implementation issues
Stride Rite is a good example of a company that has successfully migrated to Windows 2000 after carefully dealing with a wide range of hardware and application compatibility issues. Source: Windows 2000 Advantage (March 26, 2001)

Lessons Learned: Tales of a PDC upgrade
A real world look at a large scale Windows NT to Windows 2000 Migration that includes some very important "lessons learned." Source: Swynk

Migration Issues Pertaining to Group Policy
Sample chapter from the Windows 2000 Resource Kit, downloadable in Word format. Explains Group Policy, a flexible Change and Configuration Management tool. This tool includes options for registry-based policy settings, security settings, software installation, scripts, startup, shutdown, logon, logoff, and folder redirection. Source: Microsoft.com

Mixed Mode vs. Native Mode
Depending on your organization, when you convert from mixed mode to native mode can be a critical decision with major implications. It©s a one-way conversion?there?s no going back.

 

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