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Last Updated December 10, 2003

Registry
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  Book Reviews
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Editing the Windows 2000 Registry

For those new to Windows 2000, the Registry is where the Operating System stores most of its configuration data. Almost everything you do in the Windows 2000 GUI, is ultimately translated into an entry in the Registry. Fortunately, Microsoft allows Administrators the capability to edit the Registry directly to fine tune parameters and make some custom tweaks.  On the down side, haphazard edits to the Registry is the surest way we know to cripple a perfectly good system.
 DO NOT edit the Registry if you don't know what you're doing. And always back it up first. You've been warned.
Where to Start,,,
Registry Editors Installed by Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 155267 - This article discusses the versions of Registry Editor installed by Windows NT/2000 Setup. 

Registry Scripting
Part of a six part series which focuses on practical techniques for scripting and delivering Registry changes to large numbers of machines. If you support a small Windows 2000 environment, the techniques are still useful for managing Registry changes across multiple machines. Source: Windows IT Library

Simplify Registry Editing With Perl for Win32
Author: Mike McMillan Source: Windows NT Systems Magazine (Feb 1998)

Taking Control of the Registry 
This article looks at the structure and make-up of the NT Registry, explains how it works on your system, and also looks at the tools you can use to view and modify the Registry. Finally, it reviews the methods you can use to back up your Registry and recover it if it is damaged. Source: Windows NT Explorer Magazine (Jan 1999)

Uncovering New Settings in the Registry 
Enable full SAM database synchronization when NT starts, control logon parameters, and resolve networking issues.  Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (March 1998)

Using Regedit with Regedt32 to Search for Registry Values
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 168646 - Your Windows NT or Windows 2000 computer may not start due to an entry in the Registry. You will receive an error message, in certain instances, pointing to the registry value causing the problem. The Regedt32.exe program does not allow you to search for the actual registry values or data, only registry keys 

Articles and Whitepapers

Changing a User©s Default Printer in the Registry
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 156212 -  There are times when you want to change the default printer of a user or group of users without having access to the user's (or users' - computer(s -. You can do this by making a registry entry.

HOW TO: Apply Registry and File System ACLs on Computers That Are Upgraded to Windows 2000 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 313205 - This step-by-step article describes how to apply registry and file system Access Control Lists (ACLs) on computers that are upgraded from Windows NT 4.0 to Windows 2000. When you upgrade a Windows NT 4.0-based computer to Windows 2000, the registry and file system ACLs are not changed by Windows 2000 Setup. Windows 2000 handles registry and file system permissions differently than Windows NT 4.0, which allows a greater security for the server or workstation. Microsoft recommends that you apply the Windows 2000 ACLs to computers that are upgraded from Windows NT 4.0.  

How to Prevent Regedit.exe from Using the Last State
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 244004 By default, when you start Regedit.exe, it displays the last key you accessed the last time you ran Regedit. This article describes how to prevent this behavior. 

HOW TO: Restrict Users from Running Specific Windows Programs in Windows 2000 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323525 - This step-by-step article describes two methods that you can use to restrict users from running specific Windows programs on a Windows 2000-based computer. You can restrict users from running specific programs by either using Group Policy editing the Windows registry.

How to Use Regedit.exe to Rename Keys 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 216350 - Describes how you can use Regedit.exe to rename a registry key on a remote or local computer when it is loaded with Regedt32.exe.

Modify the Registry with Perl
Use this Perl script to automate Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) client IP address changes in an enterprise network. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (Jan 1998)

New Ways to Mine the Registry
Editing the Registry using nontraditional tools such as batch files, the command prompt, and your Web browser can help prevent a system crash. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (Dec 1997)

Taking Control of the Registry 
This article looks at the structure and make-up of the NT Registry, explains how it works on your system, and also looks at the tools you can use to view and modify the Registry. Finally, it reviews the methods you can use to back up your Registry and recover it if it is damaged. Source: Windows NT Explorer Magazine (Jan 1999)

The Regback Profile Quirk © 
Learn a method to handle this quirky resource kit utility. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (Nov 1999)

The Regfind Tool
Regfind lets you search the registry for character strings, perform global replace procedures, and modify remote systems© registries.
Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (August 2002)

Uncovering New Settings in the Registry 
Enable full SAM database synchronization when NT starts, control logon parameters, and resolve networking issues.  Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (March 1998)

Using System.alt to Recover the System Hive
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 151247 - If your system fails to boot because the System hive is corrupt, it may be possible to rename the System.alt file to System to recover Windows NT. This file is located in the Systemroot\System32\Config directory. It is recommend to first try to use the Emergency Repair Disk (ERD) to recover the System hive.  

 

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