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Last Updated December 16, 2003

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Windows 2000 Interoperability Resources

NT and Windows 2000 aren't the only Network Operating Systems available. UNIX and Novell have been around a bit longer and are still very popular in many environments. Getting Microsoft's software to "play nice" with other Operating Systems can be tricky if you don't understand some of the rules. Here are a few resources to get things running smoothly.
Where to Start
Interoperability with Other DNS Servers
Summary: Discusses new features of Windows 2000 DNS, such as Active Directory integration, multimaster replication, dynamic and secure dynamic update, and aging and scavenging. Also discusses integration with WINS and interoperability with other DNS servers. Source: Microsoft.com

Interoperability Capabilities
Summary: Windows 2000 Server uses a standards-based approach for interoperating with other operating systems. Source: Microsoft.com

Active Directory Interoperability and Metadirectory Overview
Summary: This strategy white paper addresses solution requirements for dealing with disparate identity information, including the sharing of identity information between different resources, the distribution of identity changes amongst various resources, and ensuring that related data remain consistent throughout the enterprise. Source: Microsoft.com

Windows 2000 Professional in a Windows NT Server 4.0 Environment
Summary: This paper describes the benefits of using Windows 2000 Professional in network environments running the Windows NT Server operating system versions 4.0 and 3.51. 

Novell Netware

Cannot Start NetWare Application Launcher in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 222176 - When you attempt to start NetWare Application Launcher (NAL), you receive error messages stating that dynamic link library (DLL) files are missing.

Explanation of Gateway Services for NetWare
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 121394 - The objective of Gateway Services for NetWare (GSNW) is to allow Microsoft networking clients to access files that reside on NetWare servers without having to load NetWare client software. Following is a brief description of how GSNW works.

HOW TO: Configure Windows Clients to Use Both NetWare Servers and Windows 2000 Servers
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 300976 - This step-by-step article is intended for use by network administrators who operate in an environment that requires client access to both Windows 2000 and Novell NetWare resources but do not wish to install additional software on each client.

HOW TO: Configure a User Account to Log on to Windows 2000-Based Computer from a NetWare Client 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 316100 - This step-by-step article describes how to configure a domain user account so that it can log on to a Windows 2000 Server-based computer (on which File and Print services for NetWare is installed) from a NetWare client computer. After you do so, the user account will be able to access resources on this server from a NetWare client computer. 

HOW TO: Install the SAP Agent on a Windows 2000-Based Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 316072 - This step-by-step guide describes how to install the SAP agent on a Windows 2000 Server-based computer. After you install the SAP agent, Windows 2000 Server uses the SAP agent to maintain a list of the available NetWare servers and services 

How to Migrate or Deploy a Novell NetWare Environment to Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 274279 - If you are considering migrating from Novell NetWare to Windows 2000 or need information on a mixed environment deployment, this article provides strategies and recommendations to get you started. 

HOW TO: Migrate Users from NetWare to Windows 2000 with the MSDSS Tool and One-Time Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 301542 - This step-by-step guide describes how to migrate user accounts, settings, and objects from a NetWare 3.x, 4.x, or 5.x server to a Windows 2000-based server by using the Microsoft Directory Synchronization Services (MSDSS) tool and a one-way migration. 

HOW TO: Use Gateway Services for NetWare to Share a NetWare Printer with Windows Client Computers 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 316088 - This step-by-step article describes how to use Gateway Services for NetWare to share a NetWare printer with Windows-based client computers. After you complete the procedure that is described in this article, Windows-based clients can connect to the shared printer on the Windows 2000 Server-based computer on which Gateway Services for NetWare is installed to gain access to the shared NetWare printer. 

HOW TO: Use Gateway Services for NetWare to Share a NetWare Volume or Folder with Windows-Based Client Computers 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 316083 - This step-by-step article describes how to use Gateway Services for NetWare to share either a NetWare volume or a NetWare folder with Windows-based client computers. After you complete the procedure that is described in this article, Windows-based clients connect to a shared folder on the Windows 2000 Server-based computer on which Gateway Services for NetWare is installed to gain access to either the shared NetWare volume or the shared NetWare folder.

Installing a Novell GroupWise5.5 System to a NetWare Server from Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 218581 - Novell GroupWise5.5 is messaging system software that requires the presence of at least one NetWare 4.1x (or later) server on the network. (updated 962000) 

Integrating Windows NT Server, DHCP and WINS into a Novell NetWare IP Environment
The goal of this paper is to provide both a summary and detailed background on how Microsoft Windows NT Dynamic Hosts Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) can be successfully integrated into Novell NetWare IP environments. Included in the document is a discussion of what connectivity services are supported in different network configurations

Interoperability in a Novell NetWare Environment
Windows 2000 Professional is designed to provide end users and IT professionals with powerful new productivity capabilities in any type of enterprise environment. This paper focuses on the capabilities of Windows 2000 Professional in a Novell NetWare environment, including NetWare 5, 4.x and older environments. Source: Microsoft.com

Long Delay in Opening Computer Folder if Computer Is a NetWare Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 269590 - When you try to open a computer folder on a NetWare-based (or compatible - network, you may experience a delay of 20-30 seconds. 

Microsoft Services for NetWare
Strategy paper shows how Microsoft Services for NetWare delivers a complete set of new interoperability services and tools for integrating the Windows 2000 Server product family, as well as Windows NT Server 4.0, into existing NetWare environments. Source: Microsoft.com

MSDSS Migration Does Not Work If Multiple Naming Attributes Are Present for an Object
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 270159 - When you perform a migration from Novell Directory Services (NDS) to Active Directory by using Microsoft Directory Synchronization Services (MSDSS), the migration process may stop unexpectedly and you may receive the following error message

NetWare 5 "Contextless Login" Not Supported with GSNW or CSNW in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 216821 - "Contextless logins" are a new feature in Novell NetWare version 5, whereby users do not have to specify a context before logging on. NetWare 5 uses NDS catalog services for a global search to find a user's context.  (updated 8/30/2000)

NetWare to Windows 2000 Server Migration Planning Guide
This document provides a guide for customers planning to migrate all or part of their NetWare environment to the Windows 2000 Server operating system. A description of the NetWare migration and interoperability tools provided by Microsoft is included, as well as a step by step planning guide to how the tools can be used to migrate NetWare files, directories, and file and print services to Windows 2000 Server and the Active Directory service. Source: Microsoft.com

Read-Only Files Cause Roaming Profile Update to NetWare Server Not to Work 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 273473 - If you have a roaming profile stored on a NetWare server, you may receive the following error messages when you log on: 

Rollup of Fixes for File and Print Services for NetWare (FPNW) Version 5.0
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 264510 - Microsoft has released an update that corrects the following problems in Microsoft File and Print Services for NetWare (FPNW) version 5.0 

Services for NetWare v.5: The resource for Microsoft Windows 2000 Interoperability with NetWare
The Microsoft Windows 2000 Server operating system builds on the strengths of Windows NT technology, combining standards-based directory, Web, application, communications, file, and print services with high reliability, efficient management, and support for the latest advances in networking hardware. To bring these benefits to customers who have chosen the Novell NetWare operating system and to help them migrate to Windows 2000 Server, Microsoft developed Microsoft Services for NetWare v.5 (SFNW5). Source: Microsoft.com

Setting Default Server and Script Options in CSNW
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 163979 - This article describes how to set a Default Preferred Server or Default Tree and Context, as well as Default Script Options for Client Services for NetWare (CSNW) and Gateway Services for NetWare (GSNW). 

Synchronizing Windows 2000 Active Directory with Novell Directories 
Microsoft Directory Synchronization Services (MSDSS), included with Services for NetWare 5, makes Active Directory synchronization with NDS and NetWare 3.x binderies possible. Source: Microsoft.com

Troubleshooting Win2K and NetWare Interoperability
Getting networks to play well together isn't always as easy as it should be -- especially when you may have inherited one as the result of a merger. Written from the perspective of a Windows networking manager, we take a look at how to get Novell and Microsoft networks to co-exist and provide transparent services for users. Source: EarthWeb (April 12, 2001)

Understanding Novell's NDS for NT 2.0
Novell markets its NDS for NT 2.0 product as a way for companies to manage Windows NT Server 4.0 operating system environments by using Novell's NWAdmin management utility and the Novell Directory Service (NDS). Although NDS for NT offers some benefits to administrators who must manage both NetWare and Windows NT-based servers, the way in which Novell has designed NDS for NT 2.0 creates certain risks, limitations, and weaknesses that administrators should assess when choosing such tools.

Windows 2000 Can Leave an Unlicensed Connection Active After Logging Off a NetWare 4.x/ 5.x Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263546 - When clients connect to a Windows 2000 Terminal Services server or to Windows 2000 Professional and connect to a Novell NDS tree through a logon script or a mapped drive using Client Services for NetWare (CSNW -, the connection remains on the (updated 182001) 

Windows 2000 Professional in a NetWare Environment
Microsoft Windows 2000 is ideal for mixed environments where users must interact with Novell NetWare, UNIX or mainframe servers, as well as Windows 2000 Server or Windows NT Server. This guide outlines the steps to install and configure the Windows 2000 Professional operating system in a Novell NetWare-based network. Source: Microsoft.com

Windows Services for NetWare 5.0
Windows Services for NetWare version 5.0 provides a set of interoperability utilities that helps to simplify the introduction of Windows 2000 Server and its Active Directory service into a NetWare/NDS network environment. Services for NetWare includes three major tools to simplify the adoption of Windows 2000 Server, reduce overall network administration, and facilitate the migration to Windows 2000 Server from NetWare. Source: Microsoft.com

You Cannot Configure NTFS Permissions to Hide Files or Folders from Unauthorized Users 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 303758 - Novell NetWare administrators can configure permissions so that users cannot see files or folders in the file system for which the users do not have Read access by removing the File Scan (F) permission. This type of access control is not supported by the NTFS file system. Therefore, users can view the contents of any folder for which the user has the List permission. Removing the List permission for the folder prevents the user from gaining access to any file in the folder. (updated 1/15/2002) 

Unix & Linux
ACE Inheritance in Windows Services for UNIX 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 321049 - If you are an administrator who manages file servers for an organization, your day-to-day tasks may include cleanup and maintenance, setting and monitoring quotas, file system backup, and other similar tasks. Many of these tasks are automated. To complete these tasks, you may want to have complete control over the data and files on a disk. This article describes how to set ACEs for inheritance at the top level and to configure these ACEs to be honored throughout the folder hierarchy for shares that are exported over a network file system (NFS) (or a CIFS and an NFS). 

Analysts say transition from Windows to Linux isn't easy
Industry analysts warn that moving from Windows to Linux can be challenging, so look before you leap. Source: TechTarget.com

Connecting Linux Workstations to Windows 2000 Servers
Find out how to transfer data between Win2K or NT servers and Linux workstations. Source: Windows 2000 Magazine (May 2000)

HOW TO: Configure Server for NIS for a UNIX to Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324541 - Server for NIS integrates the Network Information System (NIS) master role into Active Directory. As a result, you can migrate an existing NIS domain to Active Directory or create a fresh new NIS domain. If you do so, you can use either Microsoft Management Console (MMC) or the Nisadmin.exe and Nismap.exe command-line utilities to administer the NIS domain

HOW TO: Install Client for NFS on Windows for a UNIX to Windows Migration
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324055 - You may find it easier to migrate files from an existing UNIX server to a Windows-based server if you use NFS instead of File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to move the files. Additionally, if you use Client for NFS, ongoing access to the UNIX host is available. This functionality makes it easier to stage the migration over time.

HOW TO: Configure Default Permissions in Gateway for NFS for a UNIX to Windows Migration Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324540 - The default permissions for all Gateway for NFS shared file systems determine the initial permissions mask for files that are created on NFS resources that are shared to Windows clients by using the Gateway for NFS component. You can set the default permission globally by using either the Services for Unix Administration Microsoft Management Console (MMC) or by using the NFSAdmin utility from the command line. These permissions configure the starting umask for any NFS resources that are created through Gateway for NFS; however, the NFS permissions can be changed later by users who have the appropriate level of authority on the UNIX computer.

HOW TO: Configure File Name Character Translation in Server for NFS to Support a UNIX to Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324218 - Both UNIX and Windows include a set of valid file name characters; however, these sets are different for each program. If you do not turn on and configure character translation, Server for NFS cannot create some valid UNIX file names and you may receive an error message if you try to create a file. The following list includes examples of characters that are supported in file names in UNIX but are not supported in Windows:

Configuring Server for NFS File Security Permissions 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 262984 - This article describes registry settings that you can use to configure file security permissions for the Windows Services for UNIX 2.0 Server for NFS component. These registry entries affect how file permissions are approximated between Microsoft Windows NT/Microsoft Windows 2000 and UNIX 

HOW TO: Determine Site Requirements for a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323948 - This article describes how to determine site requirements for a UNIX-to-Windows migration. Before you start the migration process, you must identify the elements to be transferred to the new Web server. There are many different elements to consider, and a number of different ways to determine these elements before you make the move.

HOW TO: Determine Hardware Requirements for a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323946 - This articles describes how to determine the hardware requirements you will have when you migrate your computer from UNIX to Windows 2000.

HOW TO: Fix File and Path Conflicts in a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324053 - After you have identified potential conflicts in your site, you must fix them before you transfer the site to Windows. This document shows you how to make these changes quickly and easily.

HOW TO: Identify Potential File and Folder Problems in a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324054 - You must be careful when you migrate HTML files and other Web elements to Windows from UNIX. Differences may occur in the file systems, the characters that these systems allow, and the system configuration between the programs. These differences can prevent sites from being displayed correctly. This article describes how to identify potential problems.

HOW TO: Install Interix 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324081 - The Interix subsystem provides a fully POSIX-compliant environment that runs as a native subsystem in the Windows kernel. It includes both the Korn Shell and the C Shell and over 350 command-line utilities. If you install Interix Software Development Kit (SDK), you have full support for more than 1,900 UNIX functions.

HOW TO: Install Server for NIS on Windows for UNIX to Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324083 - Windows Services for UNIX provides a full Active-Directory based implementation of the Network Information Service (NIS). NIS is used by UNIX-based computers to provide a centralized database for a variety of information about the network. 

HOW TO: Identify Potential File and Folder Problems in a UNIX to Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324054 - You must be careful when you migrate HTML files and other Web elements to Windows from UNIX. Differences may occur in the file systems, the characters that these systems allow, and the system configuration between the programs. These differences can prevent sites from being displayed correctly. This article describes how to identify potential problems. 

HOW TO: Install Server for PCNFS to Support Windows Clients on a UNIX Network 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324084 - Windows clients that use Client for NFS can authenticate to the UNIX NFS server by using NIS or PCNFSD. When an NFS client accesses files on an NFS server, User Name Mapping service maps the Windows user and group security identifier (SID) 

HOW TO: Install Password Synchronization on a Windows Host 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324082 - Windows Services for UNIX version 3.0 provides the programs and services that are requried to support bidirectional password synchronization between Windows and UNIX or Linux computers. Password changes can originate from either Windows-based 

HOW TO: Install Password Synchronization on a UNIX Host for a UNIX to Windows Migration Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324542 - Windows Services for UNIX provides precompiled binaries to support password synchronization on supported UNIX and Linux hosts. The following list describes supported hosts for Windows Services for UNIX 3.0:

HOW TO: Install Perl for a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323960 - Perl is the leading scripting language that is used for developing dynamic Web sites under the UNIX platform. The Perl language is mostly cross-platform aware. Unless you are using many UNIX-specific features, most scripts are easily migrated to the Windows platform. This article describes how to install the Perl language interpreter and configure the Internet Information Services (IIS) server to use Perl for CGI scripts, how to use Perl scripts as an ISAPI filter, and how to configure Perl to act as an accepted language for Active Server Pages (ASP)

HOW TO: Install Services for UNIX 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323966 - This step-by-step article describes how to install Services for UNIX (SFU). SFU is a suite of utilities you can use to share information and resources between UNIX and Windows computers. SFU incorporates an NFS server and client, user name mapping to match UNIX users to Windows users, UNIX shell utilities, and other capabilities.

HOW TO: Migrate .Htaccess Data in a UNIX to Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324064 - You can use the .Htaccess files to set individual properties and configuration settings for a folder. If you do so, you do not have to modify the full configuration file. You can configure some of these settings in Internet Information Server

HOW TO: Migrate User and Group Information 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324222 - When you migrate from Apache and UNIX to Windows and Internet Information Services (IIS), you must migrate user authentication information. This article describes how to migrate most of the Apache-based user and group information to Windows
 

HOW TO: Migrate Web Site Data in a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324538 - This step-by-step article describes the basic steps that you have to consider when you are migrating Web site documents from UNIX to Windows.

HOW TO: Plan for a Large Site UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323950 - This step-by-step article describes how to plan for a large site UNIX-to-Windows migration. When you migrate from a site that is hosted by multiple UNIX computers, you must identify the method that is used in your site, and then select a strategy for the migration.

How to Plan a Successful Migration from UNIX to Windows 2000 Professional
This is a scenario-based guide designed to help project managers conduct a migration feasibility-testing project. It specifically outlines the recommended practices for a project whose purpose is to determine the feasibility of migrating UNIX-based applications to the Windows 2000 Professional operating system. Source: Microsoft.com (updated May 22, 2000)

HOW TO: Prepare for a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324215 - This article describes the basic preparations that are required to migrate existing Web sites that are hosted on the UNIX platform to Windows and Internet Information Services (IIS). This step-by-step article is one of a series of articles 

HOW TO: Prepare the Target Server for a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323970 - This step-by-step article describes how to prepare the target server for a UNIX-to-Windows migration.

HOW TO: Set Up Server for NFS 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324086 - UNIX uses Network File System (NFS) to share files and folders on the network. Windows Services for UNIX 3.0 includes the Server for NFS component that creates a full NFS version 3 server, which you can use to provide file services to UNIX

HOW TO: Set Up a Folder Structure for a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324056 - When you migrate data, first you must create the basic structure for your Web site or Web sites. To create the Web site structure, you must create the home folder for your Web site, and then you create the internal structure. You can skip the latter step if you are using zip or tar methods or a shared folder system such as Network File System (NFS) or Server Message Block (SMB) to transfer your data. This article describes how to migrate your existing structure to Windows.


HOW TO: Test and Performance Tune After a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324217 - This step-by-step article describes how to test and performance tune after a UNIX-to-Windows migration.

HOW TO: Tune Basic Performance Parameters after a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324093 - This article describes how to translate Apache performance controls to Internet Information Services (IIS) and how to take advantage of IIS-specific performance tuning parameters.

HOW TO: Understand Compatibility for a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323952 - When you migrate from UNIX to Windows 2000, you must modify and carefully transfer some information. Some elements of the two platforms are compatible. In this document you learn about the elements that are compatible, about the elements
that need attention, and about the tools that are available to help the migration process.

HOW TO: Use Client Groups in Server for NFS to Manage Permissions During a UNIX-to-Windows Migration 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 324221 - Server for NFS allows the administrator to set the mount permissions for NFS shares for groups of client computers, simplifying management. The NFS export (share) can be made available as a read-only share, a read-write share, or access can be denied for a group of computers. Root access can also be set by group.

Interoperability in a UNIX Environment
This paper focuses on the capabilities of Windows 2000 Professional in a UNIX environment. Source: Microsoft.com

Introduction to Services for UNIX
This white paper describes the objectives and features of Microsoft© Windows? Services for UNIX. Services for UNIX consists of a number of different components that can bridge the gap between Windows-based and UNIX-based operating systems running in the same network. It is targeted primarily for system administrators and programmers who have to use both these systems. Services for UNIX focuses on are file sharing, remote access and administration, password synchronization, common directory management, and a common set of utilities and a shell. Source: Microsoft TechNet CD Online (June 22, 2000)

Linux basics for Windows pros
IT pros who know how to improve performance and tune proprietary applications to run on Linux will be in big demand, analysts say. So, why not take steps toward making yourself a hot commodity? This extensive library of basic Linux information has been designed with Windows professionals in mind. Source: TechTarget.com

Microsoft Windows NT Services for UNIX
Discover how SFU simplifies resource access, facilitates password synchronization, and eases administration in mixed NT and UNIX environments. Source: Windows 2000 Magazine (Feb 2000)

Microsoft Windows Services for Unix
Overview paper which shows how Microsoft Windows Services for Unix 2.0 makes it easier to integrate Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 into a UNIX environment. Source: Microsoft.com

Ntoskrnl and NTFS Performance Changes for Services for UNIX
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 265069 - The Compaq Emerging Technologies Group, in partnership with Microsoft, is developing a Network Attached Storage system that will advertise vast amounts of storage on a network. This joint development effort has uncovered an issue in Windows

Password Synchronization in Microsoft Windows Services for UNIX
Password Synchronization in Microsoft© Windows? Services for UNIX provides features to synchronize user passwords between Windows and UNIX. This white paper describes the Password Synchronization feature included as part of Services for UNIX version 2.0. Source: Microsoft TechNet CD Online (June 22, 2000)

Samba expert digs into 3.0 upgrade
Some key features make Samba 3.0 a better mousetrap than Samba 2.0 for Windows-Linux file and print sharing, says Samba Team co-founder John H. Terpstra, Source: TechTarget.com

Samba upgrade enables simple NT 4.0 migration
IT administrators need just one command to execute the key feature of the latest Samba upgrade, version 3.0, which enables seamless migration of a Windows NT 4.0 domain to Samba. Source: TechTarget.com

Server for NIS Overview
Services for UNIX includes Server for NIS, an NIS server that runs on the Microsoft© Windows? 2000 operating system and allows administrators to manage both Windows and UNIX networks using Windows 2000 Active Directory? service. Server for NIS allows a Windows 2000 Server domain controller to act as the master NIS server. It integrates NIS data with that of Active Directory. This white paper describes the objectives, design goals, architecture, and deployment options for Server for NIS. Source: Microsoft TechNet CD Online (June 22, 2000)

Windows 2000 Complicates Interoperability For Samba
Samba, an open-source implementation of Microsoft's Server Message Block protocol that facilitates file-sharing between Unix or Linux systems and Windows clients and servers, is not immune to interoperability problems with Windows 2000. The Samba.org group estimates thousands of users use the technology. Source: PlanetIT (April 3, 2000)

Windows 2000 Professional in a UNIX Environment
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional is an ideal platform for networks with UNIX servers, providing personal productivity applications with nearly seamless integration with UNIX services. This document shows how to accomplish some of the most basic tasks in integrating Windows 2000 Professional in a UNIX environment.

 

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