LabMice.net - The Windows 2000\XP\.NET Resource Index
Home | About Us | Search

Last Updated December 10, 2003

Troubleshooting
  Where to Start
  General Guides
  Boot.ini files
  Boot & Startup Issues
  Emergency Repair Disks
  Error Codes
  Event Logging
  Dr Watson
  Hang Conditions
  How to Guides
  Memory Dumps
  Memory Leaks
  Performance Tuning
  Recovery Console
  Task Manager
  Technical Articles
  Win2k Install Bugs
  WinNT Upgrade Bugs
  Win9x Upgrade Bugs

 Related Resources
  Hardware Guides
  Interoperability
  Printer Mgmt
  Registry
  Service Packs
  Utilities

Emergency Repair Disks

Even with Windows 2000's improvements and recovery console, maintaining and knowing how to use an Emergency Repair Disk is crucial to bringing back a system that fails to boot.
 
How to Create an Emergency Repair Disk in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 231777 - This article describes how to create an Emergency Repair Disk (ERD) in Windows 2000 for use with the Windows 2000 repair process. 

How to Manually Create an Emergency Repair Disk
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 158866 - When you try to run an emergency repair on a Windows NT or Windows 2000 system, and you do not have an emergency repair disk, the emergency repair fails when you use the files located in the \%Systemroot%\Repair folder. 

Replacing System Files with a Modified Emergency Repair Disk
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 164471 - The Windows NT Setup program and Emergency Repair Disk (ERD) can be used to replace operating system files that cannot be copied by simpler means. This procedure is most useful if an installation of Windows NT is on an NTFS partition that has been rendered unbootable. This procedure can also be used to replace files on a mirrored partition without first breaking the mirror.

Taking a closer look at the Windows NT emergency repair disk
You probably have an emergency repair disk--but have you updated it recently? And do you know what's on it, in case a real emergency strikes? Source: EarthWeb (June 13, 2000)

Articles worth reading:
BOOT.INI Required for Repair Process w/o Emergency Repair Disk
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 139894 - If you do not have an emergency repair disk (ERD) available, you can still repair a Windows NT installation by using the 3 setup disks to boot the system with disk 1. You can often boot the system if your CDRom drive supports bootable CD's (the El Torito CDRom specification). Once setup has begun, select the R option to repair the NT installation. When setup asks if you have a ERD disk, select no and setup will look at the boot.ini file for an installation path. Setup will try to find the repair directory from that path (%SystemRoot%\Repair) and use the registry files in that directory for repairs 

Differences Between Manual and Fast Repair in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 238359 - Windows 2000 includes two repair choices: Manual Repair or Fast Repair. To see these choices, boot from the Windows 2000 installation media, press R to repair, and then press R to use the Emergency Repair process. When you do this, you see the following options: Manual Repair: To choose from a list of repair options, press M. Fast Repair: To perform all repair options, press F. The two repair choices cause the Repair process to perform different tasks. 

Emergency Repair Disk Does Not Create Cluster Configuration Database
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 257892 - When you use an emergency repair disk that was created with Rdisk.exe, a backup copy of the cluster configuration database is not created. 

Emergency Repair Disk Information Requires 1.44-MB Floppy Disk
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 156052 - If you attempt to create an Emergency Repair Disk using a 720 floppy disk, you receive either of the following messages: 

HOW TO: Replace a Driver on a Windows 2000-Based Computer That Will Not Start  
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 313670 - This step-by-step article describes how to replace a driver on a Windows 2000-based computer that will not start.

Modifying the Emergency Repair Disk After Installing CD-ROM 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 110580 - By design, the Emergency Repair Disk created by a Network or Unsupported CD- ROM installation cannot be used to verify Windows NT system files.

Rdisk.exe Is Not Included with Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 216337 - Windows 2000 does not include the Rdisk.exe program that was used in Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 and earlier versions to create an Emergency Repair Disk (ERD). To create an ERD in Windows 2000: 

Repair Disk Contents Appear to Be Incomplete
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 253441 - When you view the contents of an emergency repair diskette created with Windows 2000, the set of files may appear to be incomplete, and the files on the disk are: 

Repairing a Blown-Out NT Boot Sector
Repairing a Blown-Out NT Boot Sector The multi-OS management world is riddled with danger. An OS or disk-management utility that overwrites the Windows NT-created boot sector on the first hard disk's primary partition is a common problem. During setup, select the Recovery option (use your Emergency Repair Disk--ERD), select only the option to inspect the boot sector, and let NT repair the boot sector. Source: Windows 2000 Magazine (July 1999)

Repair Disk Contents Appear to Be Incomplete
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 253441 - When you view the contents of an emergency repair diskette created with Windows 2000, the set of files may appear to be incomplete, and the files on the disk are:
Autoexec.nt, Config.nt, Setup.log

Using System.alt to Recover the System Hive
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 151247 - If your system fails to boot because the System hive is corrupt, it may be possible to rename the System.alt file to System to recover Windows NT. This file is located in the Systemroot\System32\Config directory. It is recommend to first try to use the Emergency Repair Disk (ERD) to recover the System hive. Information on using the ERD can be found on page 49 in the Installation Guide. Renaming the System.alt file should only be used as a last resort after you have tried to recover the system using the ERD. If the Windows NT system files are located on a Windows NT File System (NTFS) partition you will need to boot into another installation of Windows NT to rename the file. If the Windows NT files are located on a FAT partition you can boot from a bootable MS-DOS diskette to rename the file. 

Windows 2000 Reboots Continuously with HP 5000 Series Scanner Installed
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258098 - After you upgrade your Microsoft Windows 98-based computer to Windows 2000 Professional, the original Windows 98 drivers for the Hewlett-Packard (HP) 5000 series scanner are retained in the registry, and this prevents you from upgrading or installing the HP scanner. After you install the scanner software, your computer may stop responding (hang), or restart or reboot continuously.

 

Entire contents
© 1999-2003 LabMice.net and TechTarget
All rights reserved

This site and its contents are Copyright 1999-2003 by LabMice.net. Microsoft, NT, BackOffice, MCSE, and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Corporation in no way endorses or is affiliated with LabMice.net. The products referenced in this site are provided by parties other than LabMice.net. LabMice.net makes no representations regarding either the products or any information about the products. Any questions, complaints, or claims regarding the products must be directed to the appropriate manufacturer or vendor.