LabMice.net - The Windows 2000\XP\.NET Resource Index
Home | About Us | Search

Last Updated December 16, 2003

Windows 2003
Windows 2000
Windows XP
BackOffice
Book Reviews
Career Tools
Device Drivers
Hardware Guides
MCSE Toolkit
Networking
  Networking Basics
  Networking Books
  Network Mgmt
  Network Monitoring
  Browser Service
  Cabling
  DHCP
  DNS/DDNS
  ICS
  IPSec
  LMHOSTS Files
  NAT
  NetMon
  NLB\WLBS
  OSI Model
  RAS/RRAS
  SNMP
  TCP/IP
  VPN
  WINS
  Wireless
Service Packs
Scripting
Security
Utilities
Cybercheese

_______________

 


   

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

DNS and DDNS Resources

DNS and Dynamic DNS are the tools used by networks to resolve Fully Qualified Domain Names to IP addresses. Although DNS has been around for some time, Windows 2000 integrates a new version that is much different and improved than the implementation in Windows NT. These changes, coupled with Active Directory's integration on DNS, requires every administrator to become very proficient at DNS.

Recommended Books

Windows 2000 DNS
By Roger Abell, Herman Knief, Andrew Daniels and Jeffrey Graham. Published by New Riders, April 2000. Paperback, 480 pages. ISBN 0735709734  An excellent resource for understanding the new DNS implementation in Windows 2000. The book begins with a well illustrated, 90 page introduction to the industry standard implementation of DNS that is an ideal primer for new admins. The midsection digs right into the Windows 2000 specific implementation of DNS, including Dynamic DNS, and Active Directory, as well as designing, securing, and configuring DNS services. The final section is a gold mine for support personnel. The authors devote nearly 200 pages to troubleshooting, client issues, best practices, and services that can be coupled with DNS (NetBIOS, WINS, DHCP). The authors did a great job of providing plenty of supporting examples, tables, and tips throughout the book, making it (in our humble opinion) an ideal resource for instructors. Smart IS Directors should chain a copy next to their DNS Servers.

Windows 2000 DNS Server Book Cover

Windows 2000 DNS Server
By William Wong. Published by Osborne/McGraw Hill. July 2000. Paperback 704 pages, ISBN 0072124326 A very "hands on" book for DNS and an ideal sourcebook for a classroom or Administrators who are unfamiliar with DNS. In addition to the usual explanation of concepts that you would expect, the author spends a lot of time covering step by step procedures for common tasks using a familiar personal narrative rather than the dry bullet points and checklists common in most references. Each chapter is also heavily illustrated with screenshots, diagrams, and tables, and filled with the author's personal notes. Experienced Administrators will find it easy to "speed read" this book to get the important concepts and refer to the walkthroughs as a reference when actually performing tasks. Retail Price: $44.99
Where to Start....
Description of DNS
TechNet article Q174224, describing the Domain Name System and its major components

Description of How DHCP Integrates Dynamic DNS 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 191290 - When a network client receives an Internet Protocol (IP) address and related configuration information from a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server, the client may register an "A" (Host) record with the Domain Name Server (DNS), or the client may allow the DHCP server to register either an "A" (Host) record, a PTR (pointer) record, or both in the DNS database. The DHCP server keeps track of the PTR (pointer) record for the client.

DNS 
Sample Chapter 16 from Microsoft Windows 2000 TCP/IP Protocols and Services Technical Reference, by Thomas Lee and Joseph Davies.. Provides an overview of DNS, and explains how DNS works.

DNS and Active Directory
Index of articles, lab scenarios, and whitepapers by Microsoft

DNS FAQ
A great FAQ from Windows2000FAQ.com

DNS - Domain Name System
FAQ By Globetrotting.com

DNS Namespace Planning
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 254680 - The resolution of names through the use of Domain Name System (DNS) is central to Windows 2000 operation. Without proper name resolution, users cannot locate resources on the network. It is critical that the design of the DNS namespace be created with Active Directory in mind and that the larger namespace that exists on the Internet not conflict with an organization's internal namespace 

DNS primer
How DNS Works in Windows 2000 Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (Jan 2000)

Dynamic DNS in a Microsoft Small Business Server 2000 Environment
This WebCast is designed for those responsible for the setup and configuration of DNS in a Small Business Server environment. The topics will include general terms and concepts related to DNS, the function of DNS and how it relates to Active Directory, how DNS is configured both during the setup of Small Business Server 2000 and after its installation, and common troubleshooting tools.

Frequently Asked Questions About Windows 2000 DNS 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 291382 - This article describes DNS functionality in Windows 2000, and provides answers to frequently asked questions about Windows 2000 DNS.

Getting Started with Microsoft DNS Server
A supplement to the NT 4.0 Documentation summarizing DNS concepts for novice administrators. Source: Microsoft TechNet CD Online

How DNS Works
Is your organization preparing to connect to the Internet? Use these DNS references and tools to help get the job done right. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (June 2000)

How Microsoft Windows 2000 DNS Dynamic Updates Work
This WebCast will start with some background information about the Windows 2000 dynamic DNS specification. Each step in the dynamic update process will be discussed, along with DNS client behavior and a DHCP server's role. This session will also discuss common reasons for update failure.

HOW TO: Configure Windows 2000 Server to Find Networked Resources Using Domain Name System
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 300386 - This step-by-step guide is intended for new networks or networks without Domain Name System (DNS) servers. DNS servers enable users to use "friendly" resource names, such as "Color Printer" rather than, for example, an IP address. 

HOW TO: Use DNS to Find Networked Resources in Windows 2000 Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 300386 - This step-by-step guide is intended for new networks or networks without Domain Name System (DNS) servers. DNS servers enable users to use "friendly" resource names, such as "Color Printer" rather than, for example, an IP address. 

Introduction to DNS
Sample chapter 5 from the Windows 2000 Resource Kit. Learn the basic DNS concepts, including features explained in newer Requests for Comments (RFCs), such as dynamic update, from the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Source: Microsoft.com

Microsoft DNS Installation and Configuration Document
A document that describes how to install and configure a Microsoft DNS server is available for download from the Microsoft Windows NT FTP Web site.

Microsoft Windows 2000 DNS and UNIX BIND DNS Interoperability
This WebCast will review deployment options related to BIND or Windows NT© 4.0 DNS servers and some known issues integrating BIND and Windows 2000 environments.

Windows 2000 Client-side Name Resolution
This WebCast is designed to help you understand how Windows 2000 network clients attempt name resolution. The session briefly compares and contrasts Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 name resolution behavior. The session also leads you through a detailed name resolution example.

Windows 2000 DNS
Summary: Windows 2000 DNS Operating System White Paper Abstract This paper describes the Microsoft© Windows? 2000 operating system Domain Naming System (DNS), including design, implementation, and migration issues. It discusses new features of the Windows 2000 implementation of DNS, provides examples of DNS implementations, and describes the architectural criteria that network architects and administrators should consider when designing a DNS namespace for the Active Directory© directory service to provide reliable network naming services.

Windows 2000 DNS Integration
The purpose of this paper is to describe how Microsoft Windows 2000 systems utilize the Domain Name Service (DNS) to register and locate resources within a Windows 2000 network, and to discuss the issues related to integrating Windows 2000 in an existing DNS environment. by Morgan Stern, Consultant, Global Engineering - Microsoft Alliance

Windows 2000: WINS and DNS: What's New
This WebCast will discuss changes in WINS and its functions. The session will also cover the new features in WINS and how to accomplish many of the tasks you once completed in Windows NT 4.0.

DNS Administration
Comparison of a DNS Zone and DNS Domain
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 164054 Compares and contrasts Domain Name System (DNS) Zones and Domains. 

Configuring MS DNS Server  
Microsoft Online Seminar, 25 Minutes, 11/11/98

Configuring Windows 2000 DNS to Support Active Directory
This scenario shows how you can design an infrastructure for Microsoft Windows 2000 Domain Name System (DNS) servers that simplifies DNS management and that supports the Active Directory© directory service by enabling computers to locate domain controllers. It also shows how you can use Active Directory to enhance DNS security and reliability. Source: Microsoft.com

Description of DNS Reverse Lookups
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 164213 In a Domain Name System (DNS) environment, it is common for a user or an application to request a Reverse Lookup of a host name, given the IP address. This article explains this process. 

Description of the DNS SRV Resource Record Type
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 232025 - The SRV resource record allows administrators to use several servers for a single domain, to move services from host to host easily, and to designate some hosts as primary servers for a service and others as backups. 

DNS in the Active Directory Tree 
This WebCast will address best practices and concepts regarding DNS in and for Active Directory. This session will cover potential configuration and design issues, how to verify that Active Directory is correctly registering records in the DNS database, and some ways that an incorrectly configured DNS can affect your Active Directory.

DNS in the Active Directory Tree Part 2: Best Practices, Common Problems, and Troubleshooting 
This WebCast will go over some of the best practices in implementing your DNS infrastructure for your Active Directory forest. This session will cover best practices, common problems, and troubleshooting methods and tools used by Support Professionals in Microsoft Product Support Services (PSS).

DNS and Windows NT
Microsoft TechNet article

DNS Requirements for Deploying Active Directory
This document provides checklists for verifying sufficient resources for the Domain Name Service (DNS) infrastructure when deploying the Windows© 2000 Active Directory? service. Alternatively, you can use the dcdiag command line tool to automatically verify whether you have the configuration described in this document. You may download the tool from http://download.microsoft.com/download/
win2000platform/Update/5.0.2195.2103/NT5/EN-US/dcdiag_setup.exe
. Source: Microsoft.com

DHCP Dynamic Updates with DNS 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 228803 - This article describes the Dynamic DNS properties tab in Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). 

DNS Migration in a mixed environment
Windows NT Magazine looks at some of the issues that companies operating in a mixed environment with NT, UNIX, Novell, and the like will face as they migrate to Windows 2000. Source:  Windows NT Magazine (Nov 1999)

DNS Namespace Planning
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 254680 - The resolution of names through the use of Domain Name System (DNS) is central to Windows 2000 operation. Without proper name resolution, users cannot locate resources on the network. It is critical that the design of the DNS namespace be. 

DNS Records Registered by Windows 2000 Domain Controllers
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 178169 - As a function of the Netlogon service, Windows 2000 domain controllers can register one or more DNS records. When you view the properties for records that are prefixed with "_ldap", note that these entries are Service Location (SRV) records 

DNS Server Search Order Functionality in Windows NT/2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 135919 - Windows NT allows you to specify multiple Domain Name System (DNS) servers so that names are resolved even if your primary DNS server is down. If your primary DNS server (the first name in the list) does not acknowledge, Windows NT tries the next DNS server 

DNS Site Records Are Not Properly Removed After Dcpromo
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 259435 - When you create a new site, you may have a situation where at the time you created the site it did not contain domain controllers. The following event is displayed in Event Viewer: 

Host Name Resolution. Management using NT DNS
Microsoft Online Seminar, 28 Minutes, 09/03/98.

How DNS Can Divulge Sensitive Information
An indispensable directory service may be giving away your secrets. Source: Network Magazine (March 1999)

Integrating UNIX DNS with Windows 2000
Gain a better understanding of Win2K's DNS requirements and explore three UNIX DNS and Win2K integration options. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine (Feb 2000)

Integrating Windows 2000 DNS into an Existing BIND or Windows NT 4.0-Based DNS Namespace 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 255913 - One feature of Windows 2000 Domain Name System (DNS) is its support for dynamic host updates (documented in RFC 2136). To take advantage of this feature, Windows 2000 DNS can be deployed in environments that have no other DNS servers 

Integrating Your Active Directory Namespace Into an Existing DNS Infrastructure With Name Overlap
This Microsoft© Windows? 2000 Resource Kit Deployment Lab Scenario shows how to use Windows 2000 Domain Name System (DNS) to support the Active Directory? directory service when a DNS server that does not support Service (SRV) resource records is authoritative for the company's DNS name, and you want the DNS name to overlap with your Active Directory domain name. A DNS server that does not support SRV records cannot support Active Directory by itself.

Windows 2000: Installing and Configuring the DNS Dynamic Update Protocol
This WebCast will cover some fundamental concepts of domain name host resolution and why it is important. This WebCast will discuss how to install and configure Windows 2000 DNS dynamic update protocol to use in both native and mixed modes in enterprise domains. This session will explain how Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) will interoperate with DNS dynamic update protocol under Windows 2000. Finally this session will briefly discuss the process for dynamically updating resource records in the DNS database zone file.

Microsoft DNS Server Registry Parameters
This article consists of 3 parts and describes settings for the Microsoft Domain Name Service (DNS) server. You can modify most settings using the DNSADMIN tool, although some settings can only be altered using Registry Editor. Part 1  Part 2 Part 3

Setting Up the Domain Name System for Active Directory
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 237675 - The Domain Name System (DNS) is the Active Directory locator in Windows 2000. Active Directory clients and client tools use DNS to locate domain controllers for administration and logon. You must have a DNS server installed and configured for Active Directory and the associated client software to function correctly. This article guides you through the required DNS configuration.

The Structure of a Domain Name System Boot File
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 194513 - This article discusses the structure and functionality of a boot file within the Domain Name System (DNS) schema. The first file in a DNS server is the boot file. However, the boot file is not defined in the Request for Comments (RFCs) and is not needed for a DNS server to be RFC compliant. Boot files are actually a part of the Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND) implementation of DNS. Boot files determine the startup behavior for DNS servers that incorporate the BIND specifications. A Microsoft Windows 2000 DNS server is compatible with the BIND implementation that supports the use of boot files. 

The Structure of a DNS SOA Record
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 163971 - The first resource record in any Domain Name System (DNS) Zone file should be a Start of Authority (SOA) resource record. The SOA resource record indicates that this DNS name server is the best source of information for the data within this 

Unable to Prevent DNS Zone Administrator from Creating New Zones
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 256643 - The Windows 2000 DNS White Paper describes how to delegate administration of a zone to a DNS administrator so that a DNS administrator can administer a specific zone but is not able to modify other configured zones. 

Understanding and Troubleshooting DNS in Windows 2000 
Microsoft has released a free training course titled "Understanding and Troubleshooting DNS in Windows 2000" that is available for download as a compressed file that contains a CD ISO image and instructions about how to create a CD from the image. This course provides in-depth discussion of Domain Name Service (DNS) as implemented in Windows 2000, with emphasis on best practices for installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting the DNS Client service and DNS Server service in Windows 2000 networking and Active Directory directory service environments.  Source: Microsoft.com

Windows 2000 DNS Boot File Can Be Named Boot or Boot.dns 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 240088 - Windows 2000 can load the Directory Naming Service (DNS) boot file from a text file. This makes moving zone files from a third-party DNS server or a Microsoft Windows NT DNS server easy. The boot file's default name in Windows 2000 is Boot (the file name has no extension). This file may have been named Boot.dns previously, so Windows 2000 loads either of these files, but saves the file only as Boot (with no extension).

How to Articles

Clearing DDNS Per-Scope Properties 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 255923 - After you configure Dynamic DNS (DDNS) properties on a scope, it is not possible to clear the per-scope DNS properties using the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) snap-in. The control of that scope©s DNS properties cannot be returned to the server level 

Creating a DNS Alias Record
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 168322 - This explains why a Domain Name Service (DNS) Alias record is needed, and how to create it. 

HOW TO: Add a User to the DNS Administrators Group in Windows 2000 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 303669 - This step-by-step article describes how to add a user to the Windows 2000 DNS Administrators group. Members of the DNS Administrators group can view and modify all DNS data, settings, and configurations (members of this group cannot manage all of the aspects of the server). The DNS services run on a domain controller. You must be a domain administrator to complete the procedure that is described in this article. 

How to configure DNS and Proxy Server 2.0 on the same computer
TechNet article Q183751 To configure Microsoft DNS on a computer that is also running Microsoft Proxy Server 2.0 with packet filtering enabled, you need to manually create a filter.

HOW TO: Configure DNS Records for Your Web Site in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article  Q315982 - This article describes how to configure your Domain Name System (DNS) server to host an externally accessible (that is, accessible from the Internet) Web site. 

HOW TO: Configure DNS Dynamic Update in Windows 2000 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 317590 - This article describes how to configure the DNS dynamic update functionality in Windows 2000. The DNS dynamic update functionality enables DNS client computers to register and dynamically update their resource records with a DNS server whenever changes occur. If you use this functionality, you can reduce the need for manual administration of zone records, especially for clients that frequently move or change locations and use Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to obtain an Internet Protocol (IP) address.  

HOW TO: Configure DNS in a New Workgroup Environment in Windows 2000 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 301197 - This step-by-step guide is intended for new workgroups without Domain Name System (DNS) servers. With DNS servers, users can use "friendly" names to contact resources. "Friendly" names are simple English names that represent a network resource 

HOW TO: Configure DNS Records for Your Web Site in Windows 2000 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 315982 - This article describes how to configure your Domain Name System (DNS) server to host an externally accessible (that is, accessible from the Internet) Web site. 

HOW TO: Configure a Secondary Name Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 313563 - This step-by-step article describes how to configure a secondary DNS server. 

HOW TO: Configure Windows 2000 DNS in a New Workgroup Environment
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 301197 - This step-by-step guide is intended for new workgroups without Domain Name System (DNS) servers. With DNS servers, users can use "friendly" names to contact resources. "Friendly" names are simple English names that represent a network resources. 

How to Configure the Windows 2000 Domain Name System to Age Records
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 296116 - This article discusses how to configure the Domain Name System (DNS) on a Windows 2000-based server to age records.

HOW TO: Configure Windows 2000 Server to Find Networked Resources Using Domain Name System
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 300386 - This step-by-step guide is intended for new networks or networks without Domain Name System (DNS) servers. DNS servers enable users to use "friendly" resource names, such as "Color Printer" rather than, for example, an IP address. 

How to Convert DNS Primary Server to Active Directory Integrated
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 198437 Describes how to convert a primary DNS server to an Active Directory Integrated Primary server, force replication to another domain controller, and add the new domain controller as a DNS server. 

How to Convert a DNS Server to a Root DNS Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 231794 - A Domain Name System (DNS) server is a hierarchical namespace structure designed to provide host to IP address name resolution and registration. There are 2 types of DNS servers that are installed for domain controllers in the Active Directory 

How to Create a Caching-Only Name Server with Microsoft DNS 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 167234 - A caching only name server is a Domain Name System (DNS) Server that is not authoritative for any particular domain. Its only function is to look up names for clients and cache them. 

HOW TO: Create a New Zone on a DNS Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 308201 - This article is a step-by-step guide for creating a Domain Name System (DNS - zone for a new domain. 

How to Disable Dynamic DNS Registration in Windows 2000
TechNet Article Q178148 A computer running Windows 2000 attempts to dynamically register with the domain name system (DNS) servers listed in the TCP/IP properties. This article describes how to disable dynamic registration with DNS servers.

How to Disable Windows 2000 Dynamic Domain Name System Registrations with Group Policy
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 294832 - This article describes how to disable the dynamic Domain Name System (DNS) registration behavior of Windows 2000 client computers with a Windows 2000 Group Policy. Windows 2000 supports dynamic DNS updates (refer to Request for Comments [RFC] 2136). This behavior is enabled by default for Windows 2000 DNS clients. 

How to Enable/Disable Windows 2000 Dynamic DNS Registrations
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 246804 - Windows 2000 supports dynamic Domain Name System (DNS) updates (per RFC 2136). This behavior is enabled by default for Windows 2000 DNS clients. 

How to Globally Configure WINS and DNS Parameters to Be Assigned to RAS Clients 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 232691 - You can globally configure the addresses assigned to RAS clients using the registry. The preference for Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) and Directory Naming Service (DNS) addresses to be assigned is..

How to Install and Configure Microsoft DNS Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 172953 - This article is designed as an introduction to the Microsoft Domain Name Service (DNS) included with Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0. This guide will take you through the steps needed to install and configure DNS on your Windows NT Server

HOW TO: Integrate Windows 2000 DNS with an Existing DNS Infrastructure in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 301190 - This step-by-step article describes how to with install and configure a new Windows 2000 Domain Name Services (DNS) server within an existing DNS server environment where Active Directory is not enabled.

HOW TO: Integrate Windows 2000 DNS with Existing DNS Infrastructure If Active Directory Is Enabled
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 301191 - This step-by-step article describes how to install and configure a new Windows 2000 Domain Name Services (DNS) server within an existing DNS server environment with Active Directory enabled.


HOW TO: Migrate an Existing Domain Name System Infrastructure from a BIND-Based Server to a Windows 2000-Based Domain Name System Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 301192 - This step-by-step guide describes how to replace an existing Domain Name System (DNS) infrastructure with a new Windows 2000 DNS infrastructure. This includes installing the Windows 2000-based DNS server and configuring it to perform name resolution. 

How to Modify Time to Live on Domain Name System Records
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 297510 - This article describes the steps to modify Time to Live (TTL) on Domain Name System (DNS) records. 

How to Move Windows 2000 DNS Zones to Another Windows 2000-based Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 280061 - This article describes how to move the zone files from one DNS server that is running Windows 2000 to another DNS server that is running Windows 2000.

How to Prevent Domain Controllers from Dynamically Registering DNS Names
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 198767 - By default, the Netlogon service on a domain controller registers dynamic Domain Name Service (DNS) records to advertise Active Directory directory service services. This behavior can be disabled with a registry setting. 

How to Prevent Windows 2000 from Assigning WINS and DNS Addresses to RAS Clients
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 232651 - In Windows 2000, the Remote Access Service assigns Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) and Domain Name System (DNS) addresses to clients when they dial in. Clients register their IP addresses with these servers.

HOW TO: Replace the Current Primary DNS Server with a New Primary Windows 2000 DNS Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 300468 - The step-by-step article describes how to set up a Windows 2000 DNS server as the primary Domain Naming System (DNS) server in an existing DNS domain. When an existing DNS domain structure is in place, it may be necessary to replace the current primary DNS server with a new Windows 2000 DNS server. DNS is the software that puts names to number mappings on computers. 

How to Upgrade a WINS or DHCP Database to Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 215416 Describes how to upgrade a DHCP or WINS database from a Microsoft Windows NT 3.51 server to a Windows 2000 server. 

How to View Saved Directory Service, DNS Server, and File Replication Service Event Logs from Another Windows 2000-Based Computer
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 235427 - Windows 2000 Event Viewer includes three new event logs:

How to Verify Large Numbers of DNS Records by Using DNSLint
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 330105 - You can verify particular sets of DNS records on multiple DNS servers to diagnose and fix problems that missing or incorrect DNS records can cause by using the /ql (Query List) option in DNSLint. 

Installing DHCP and DDNS on a Domain Controller
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 255134 - Installing Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and Domain Name System (DNS) on the same computer may allow name "hijacking." Evaluate the information in this article to determine whether it applies to your environment.

Setting Up the Domain Name System for Active Directory
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 237675 - The Domain Name System (DNS) is the Active Directory locator in Windows 2000. Active Directory clients and client tools use DNS to locate domain controllers for administration and logon. You must have a DNS server installed and configured for Active Directory and the associated client software to function correctly. This article guides you through the required DNS configuration.

Using NSlookup.exe
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 200525 Nslookup.exe is a command-line administrative tool for testing and troubleshooting DNS servers. This tool is installed along with the TCP/IP protocol through Control Panel. This article includes several tips for using Nslookup.exe. 

Troubleshooting Articles

Troubleshooting Windows 2000 DNS 
Sample chapter from the Windows 2000 Resource Kit. Discusses new features of Windows 2000 DNS, such as Active Directory integration, multimaster replication, dynamic and secure dynamic update, and aging and scavenging. Also discusses integration with WINS and interoperability with other DNS servers.

Troubleshooting Windows 2000 Domain Name System Dynamic Update Problems
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 287156 - This article describes the dynamic update process that is used between Windows 2000-based client computers and Windows 2000-based Domain Name System (DNS) servers. The typical points of failure in the update process and how to diagnose them 

Understanding and Troubleshooting DNS in Windows 2000 
Microsoft has released a free training course titled "Understanding and Troubleshooting DNS in Windows 2000" that is available for download as a compressed file that contains a CD ISO image and instructions about how to create a CD from the image. This course provides in-depth discussion of Domain Name Service (DNS) as implemented in Windows 2000, with emphasis on best practices for installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting the DNS Client service and DNS Server service in Windows 2000 networking and Active Directory directory service environments.  Source: Microsoft.com

Microsoft Windows 2000: Domain Name System (DNS) Troubleshooter
This troubleshooter is designed to help you resolve problems with the Domain Name System, which maps domain name addresses (such as www.microsoft.com) to IP addresses. Select one of the problems described above, and this troubleshooter will recommend troubleshooting steps that help solve the problem as quickly as possible.

Description of the DNSLint Utility 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article DNSLint is a Microsoft Windows utility that helps you to diagnose common DNS name resolution issues. This utility is available for download from the Microsoft Download Center: Download DNSLint now 

Microsoft Windows: Using the DNSLint Utility
This WebCast will discuss DNSLint, a new utility in Microsoft Windows that helps you troubleshoot DNS issues. DNSLint has three primary functions that verify Domain Name System (DNS) records and generate an HTML report. This session focuses on how DNSLint functions and how you can use it.

Replacing Root Hints with the Cache.dns File 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 249868 - You may experience one or more of the following symptoms: The DNS server is unable to resolve names for which it is not authoritative; There are no servers listed on the DNS server Root Hints tab; The servers listed on the Root Hints tab do not match the Cache.dns file in the %systemroot%\system32\dns folder ; When you replace the Cache.dns file in the %systemroot%\system32\dns folder, it does not update the root hints listed in the DNS Manager


A Windows 2000 Client Does Not Register the Primary Domain Name in Some Situations  
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 308441 - A Windows 2000-based client does not register the Domain Name System (DNS) primary domain name if the client is configured to perform updates with both the primary domain name and the adapter-specific domain name. This problem occurs if the the client's Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server is configured to perform updates on behalf of the client always. In this configuration, the client registers only its adapter-specific domain name. 

Access Violation in Dns.exe When You Attempt to Use Unicode Characters
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258073 - When you attempt to use zone files with Unicode strings, the DNS Server service may stop and one of the following error messages may be displayed 

Cannot Clear the Cache on a DNS Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 257828 - When you attempt to clear the Domain Name System (DNS) cache, you may receive an error message 

Cannot Start Windows 2000 with a Large Number of DNS Zones
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 259930 - When you try to start your computer after you have added several thousand DNS zones, you may receive the following error message: \\winnt\system32\config\system file is missing or corrupt. This problem can occur if the System hive is equal to or greater than 16 megabytes (MB). If the System hive is full, you may not be able to start your computer 

Computer Stops Responding During Windows 2000 DNS Query 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 311309 - During DNS name resolution on your client computer, your computer may stop responding (hang), and this may happen in multiple processes including services. 

.dns Files Remain in the DNS Folder After Active Directory Is Installed
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 231359 - After you install Active Directory and integrate the DNS records into Active Directory, .dns files remain in the %SystemRoot%\System32\Dns folder. This occurs with both primary and secondary zones. 

DNS Caches Last Negative Response Returned on Multihomed Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263876 - When you query a DomainNameService (DNS)namefrom a multihomed Windows 2000-based computer that is connected to disjoint networks, you may receive a negativenameresponse for an existing name.

DNS Does Not Send Name Query to WINS with CNAME Records
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 254541 - When the host name that is associated with an alias in DNS (cname) does not have an address record, DNS terminates the query. In Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, DNS attempts to resolve the host name with WINS. 

DNS Domain Setting Unchanged After Promotion to Domain Controller
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 223347 - After upgrading a member server to a domain controller (DC) in a new domain, the original DNS zone set on the computer is unchanged and must be reset manually in the DNS properties for the adapter. 

DNS Dynamic Updates May Not Work
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 262188 - You may notice that Dynamic DNS updates to a Windows 2000 DNS server silently fail to update an existing host record. This problem can occur in an Active Directory integrated DNS environment in which scavenging is enabled for the DNS zone 

DNS Manager May Damage Certain SOA Values in RNAME Field
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 279280 - If you use an administrative e-mail address that contains a period (or dot) in the name part of the address, the address may not be kept in the correct format when it is stored in the SOA record of a DNS zone. 

DNS Manager Monitor Test May Not Work on a Non-Domain Controller DNS Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 275525 - When you perform a manual test for a simple query on a Domain Name System (DNS) server that is not a domain controller, the test may not succeed; you may receive a "name resolution failed" result from the query.

DNS Name Resolution May Not Work for the FTP GUID
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 252818 - Windows 2000 Globally Unique Identifiers (GUIDs) are available for querying specific Domain Name System (DNS) types. With some GUIDs, including the FTP GUID, host ne resolution may not succeed. 

DNS Server Does Not Start with DBCS Domain Names
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258072 - A Windows 2000-based Domain Name System (DNS) server that is integrated with Active Directory may not start if you are using a double-byte character set (DBCS) domain name. When this issue occurs, you may see an error messages 

DNS Server Generates Event 4011
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 252695 - In certain rare cases, you may find the following entries in the Event log on a Windows 2000-based Active Directory-integrated DNS server: Event ID: 4011 The DNS server was unable to add or write an update of domain name _ldap in zone name.com to the Active Directory. OR  The DNS server was unable to add or write an update of domain name _gc in zone name.com to the Active Directory. OR The DNS server was unable to add or write an update of domain name gc in zone name.com to the Active Directory.  

DNS Server Monitoring Tests Do Not Succeed
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258263 - Even though a Domain Name System (DNS) server is configured correctly (forwarders, root hints, and so on), monitoring tests performed on a non-domain controller DNS server may not succeed.

DNS Server Problem When Dynamic Updates Occur with Conflicting Entries
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258019 - Your Windows 2000-based Domain Name System (DNS) server may generate an "access violation" error and cease to function after it receives a dynamic update. 

DNS Server Stops Using Round Robin for Host Name Resolution
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article  Q177883 - After you install Windows 2000 DNS or after you apply the latest Dns.exe, your Microsoft Windows NT Domain Name Service (DNS) server no longer responds to queries in a round robin fashion.

DNS Service Memory Leak
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258282 - The amount of memory being used by Dns.exe may continually grow and may not plateau, or memory may not be returned to the system over time. The rate of growth of the memory leak depends on the number of queries the server receives per hour. 

DNS Startup Is Longer When You Use Active Directory Integrated Zones 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 323643 - When you are using the Windows 2000 DNS service and you are using Active Directory integrated zones, the DNS service may start slower than a DNS service that is configured to use a standard primary zone.

DNS Site Records Are Not Properly Removed After Dcpromo
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 259435 - When you create a new site, you may have a situation where at the time you created the site it did not contain domain controllers. The following event is displayed in Event Viewer: 

DNS Zone Transfer Between Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0 Fails
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 203009 - When you try to perform DNS zone transfers between Windows 2000 DNS servers and a previous version of Windows NT Server with DNS service installed, you may encounter certain system errors. Restarting the server has no effect.

Dr Watson Error Message in Services.exe When You Use IPconfig.exe with the /displaydns Switch
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 262637 - When you run Ipconfig.exe with the display DNS switch (/displaydns), if the cache has a large number of entries, Services.exe may generate a Dr.Watson error message. This symptom has been noted on configurations with DomainnameResolution 

Dynamic DNS Updates Do Not Work if the DHCP Client Service Stops
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 264539 - The client computer does not send dynamic Domain Name System (DNS) updates to the DNS server even though the Register this connection's address in DNS option is selected 

Dynamic Update Does Not Work Using BIND DNS Forwarder
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 257462 - If you are using a BIND-based Domain Name System (DNS) server as forwarder on a Windows 2000-based DNS server, you may receive the following error message when a client tries to dynamically update DNS records: 

Dynamic DNS Update Option Sent to DHCP Server Even If Disabled Globally
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263550 - Windows 2000-based clients that are using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) may not receive IP addresses from non-Microsoft DHCP servers that do not recognize dynamic DNS update option 81. Disabling this option globally does not work.

Dynamic Updates Do Not Work with New DNS Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 301552 - After you create a new DNS server and change all of the information on your clients and servers to reflect the new DNS server name, the clients and servers may still dynamically register with the old server. 

Error Message When You Use the "IPCONFIG /REGISTERDNS" Command
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 266319 - When you attempt to use the ipconfig /registerdns command to register a computer's Domain Name System (DNS) records, you may receive the following error message: Error: The system cannot find the file specified. : Refreshing DNS names 

Event ID 6524 with DNS Incremental Zone Transfer Problem
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 260021 - Incremental zone transfers that are requested by Windows 2000-based secondary servers from a Bind primary may not succeed. When this occurs, event ID 6524 is recorded in the DNS event log. 

Extraneous DNS Queries Generate Network Overhead
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 295165 - If a Domain Name System (DNS - client computer is connected to the DNS server by using an Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN - link and the ISDN line is brought up in an unexpected manner, queries that should be resolved from the client 

Global.exe Does Not Recognize DNS Domain Name
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 255086 - If you attempt to use the Global.exe program with a DNS domain name, you may receive the following error message: 

Invalid Characters in DNS Queries
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258002 - Invalid characters may appear in Domain Name System (DNS) queries when you use some of the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-ins. This does not affect the operation, but it may cause extra network traffic.

Invalid DNS Records Are Not Removed
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 262289 - When you create a site that does not have a domain controller, domain controllers from other sites are assigned to cover the site. After you install a domain controller at this site, the Domain Name System (DNS) records that point to the do 

Net Logon Dynamic DNS Registration Functionality Changes After Installing Windows 2000 SP1
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 280439 - After you install Window 2000 Service Pack 1 (SP1), when you use the Net Logon service, the dynamic Domain Name System (DNS) registration functionality may not work as expected. 

No DNS Name Resolution If DHCP Client Service Is Not Running
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 268674 - When you try to resolve a host name using Domain Name Service (DNS), the attempt is unsuccessful. Communication by Internet Protocol (IP) address (even to the DNS server) and the Nslookup utility against the DNS server both work correctly. 

Routing and Remote Access IP Addresses Register in DNS
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 289735 - When DNS queries for the domain name or the domain controller's fully qualified domain name (FQDN) are sent to a Windows 2000 domain controller that is running Routing and Remote Access, the domain name or FQDN for the domain controller is resolved to an Internet protocol (IP) address that is used by Routing and Remote Access. 

SendPort DNS Registry Key Does Not Work as Expected
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 260186 - When you upgrade your Microsoft Windows NT 4.0-based computer that is running Domain Name Service (DNS) to Windows 2000, you may experience name resolution issues.

The Dsstore Tool May Not Work If the NetBIOS Name and the DNS Domain Name Are Different 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 280122 - When you use several of the available commands that are included in the Dsstore tool (Dsstore.exe -, such as dsstore DC=MyDomain,DC=com -addcrl "My Certificate Authority.crl" "My Certificate Authority" MyDomain-DC-01 (updated 6/20/2001) 

The DNS Client Service Does Not Revert to Using the First Server in the List  
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 286834 - The Windows 2000 Domain Name System (DNS - Client service (Dnscache - follows a certain algorithm when it decides the order in which to use the DNS servers that are configured in the TCP/IP properties. 

The Host's "A" Record Is Registered in DNS After You Choose Not to Register the Connection's Address
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article In Windows 2000, if you clear the Register this connection's address in DNS check box under Advanced TCP/IP Settings for a network interface, the IP address may register an A record for the host name in its primary DNS suffix zone.

The Hosts File Does Not Reflect Changes If You Alter It by Renaming or Copying 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 283092 - If you create a Hosts file in another folder or with a different name and you then copy or rename the file to %SystemRoot%\System32\Drivers\Etc\Hosts, you may not be able to resolve host names in the new Hosts file.

Unable to Prevent DNS Zone Administrator from Creating New Zones 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 256643 - The Windows 2000 DNS White Paper describes how to delegate administration of a zone to a DNS administrator so that a DNS administrator can administer a specific zone but is not able to modify other configured zones. 

Unnecessary DNS Query for _ldap._tcp.dc._msdcs.<WorkgroupName> 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 272020 - If your computer is connected to a network, but it is not part of a domain, your computer issues a DNS query for _ldap._tcp.dc._msdcs. 

Windows 2000 DHCP Server Gives Incorrect Settings for the Default Gateway or the DNS Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263217 - In Microsoft Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, and Windows 2000 Professional, you may experience the following behavior: 

Windows 2000 DNS Boot File Can Be Named Boot or Boot.dns
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 240088 - Windows 2000 can load the Directory Naming Service (DNS) boot file from a text file. This makes moving zone files from a third-party DNS server or a Microsoft Windows NT DNS server easy. The boot file's default name in Windows 2000 is Boot the file name has no extension). This file may have been named Boot.dns previously, so Windows 2000 loads either of these files, but saves the file only as Boot (with no extension).

Windows 2000 May Send Unexpected DNS Request
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263091 - A Microsoft Windows 2000-based domain controller may unexpectedly send Domain Name System (DNS) registration requests or queries for SRV records to an external DNS server. Other symptoms may include... 

Windows 2000 DNS Server May Not Start with Many Reverse Lookup Zones
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 270030 - If you have a Windows 2000 Domain Name System (DNS) environment with many DNS reverse lookup zones, the DNS server service may be slow to start or may not start completely. If you look at a network trace, you see that Netlogon continually attempts to reregister the dynamic DNS SRV records for a particular Windows 2000-based domain controller 

Windows 2000 Professional Cannot Join Windows NT 4.0 Domain with Third-Party DNS Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 260231 - A computer that is running Windows 2000 Professional cannot join a Microsoft Windows NT 4.0-based domain using a third-party Domain Name System (DNS) server if the SRV resource records are not supported. 

Zone Transfer Information Lost With Windows 2000 Active-Directory Integrated DNS 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 272089 - Zone Transfer information for any Active Directory-integrated Domain Name System (DNS) zones that begin with the underscore (_) character is lost after you reboot the domain controller. 


PowerConnect 468x60

Entire contents
© 1999-2003 LabMice.net and TechTarget
All rights reserved

This site and its contents are Copyright 1999-2003 by LabMice.net. Microsoft, NT, BackOffice, MCSE, and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Corporation in no way endorses or is affiliated with LabMice.net. The products referenced in this site are provided by parties other than LabMice.net. LabMice.net makes no representations regarding either the products or any information about the products. Any questions, complaints, or claims regarding the products must be directed to the appropriate manufacturer or vendor.