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Last Updated December 10, 2003

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"How to" Instructional Articles 

 
Best Practices for Installing and Using Printer Drivers With Windows 2000 Terminal Services
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 331055 - This article describes best practices for installing and using printer drivers with Windows 2000 Terminal Services. In Windows 2000 and later, the architecture of printer drivers was changed to unify the interface and add reliability to the server.

How to Activate a Terminal Services License Server and Install CALs Over the Internet
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 237811 - The process of deploying and tracking licenses within an organization is enhanced in Windows 2000 Terminal Services. Terminal Services Licensing now includes a Licensing wizard to download license packs and manage license quantities for Windows 

How to Apply Group Policy Objects to Terminal Services Servers
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 260370 - Microsoft Windows 2000 Terminal Services servers are installed for users in Application Server mode. When the Windows 2000 Terminal Services servers are in a Windows 2000 Active Directory domain, the domain administrator implements Group Policy Objects (GPOs) to the Terminal Services server to control the user environment. This article describes the recommended process of applying GPOs to Terminal Services without adversely affecting other Windows 2000 servers on the network 

How to Change Terminal Server's Listening Port 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 187623 -
By default Terminal Server and Windows 2000 Terminal Services uses TCP port 3389 for client connections. Microsoft does not recommend that this value be changed. However, if it becomes necessary to change this port, follow these instructions. 

How to Configure Automatic Logon to a Terminal Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 260711 - Describes how to set up automatic logon on a Terminal Server.

How to Configure Proxy Packet Filters for Terminal Server Access on the Same Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 258544 - When you install Microsoft Proxy Server 2.0 on a computer running Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server Edition or Windows 2000 Server with the Terminal Server component and packet filtering enabled, you need to create a custom filter to allow access.

HOW TO: Connect Clients to Terminal Services By Using a Terminal Services Client 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 306566 - This step-by-step article describes how to connect a Terminal Services client by using the Terminal Services client that Windows 2000 Server installation sets up for you. Terminal Services works with computer clients, Windows terminals that are using Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP), and handheld PCs that are using RDP.

HOW TO: Connect to Windows XP Terminal Services with Greater Than 256-Color Resolution Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 278502 - This step-by-step article shows you how to connect to Windows XP Terminal Services using a video resolution greater than 256-color.

HOW TO: Disconnect a Session by Using the TSDISCON Command in Windows 2000 Terminal Services 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 321705 - This article describes how to disconnect a Terminal Services session by using the tsdiscon command in Windows 2000 Terminal Services. You can use the tsdiscon command to disconnect an active Terminal Services session. The session remains attached to the Terminal Services server in a disconnected state. Programs that are currently in use continue to run. When you reconnect to the Terminal Services server, you can reconnect by using the same session from which you disconnected. You can resume working without any loss of data in the programs that were running when you disconnected.

HOW TO: Distribute Terminal Services Client Using Active Directory 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 236573 - This article describes how to distribute the Windows Terminal Services client within an enterprise by using a group policy in Active Directory.

How to Enable a User to Log On Using a Terminal Server Client
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 232057 - This article describes what you need to do to log on to Windows 2000 Terminal Server using a Terminal Server client computer.

How to install ODBC or MDAC on Terminal Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 216149 The installation of Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC) presents special challenges when installing on Terminal Server and since the Terminal Service Licensing service uses ODBC, an incorrect installation of MDAC will render the service inoperable.

HOW TO: Install the Terminal Services Client in Windows 2000
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 314894 - This step-by-step article describes how to install the Windows Terminal Services client on a computer running Windows 2000.

Support WebCast: Microsoft Office XP: Installing Office XP on a Windows 2000 Terminal Server
This Support WebCast will talk about installing Microsoft Office XP on a Microsoft Windows 2000 Terminal Server. It will discuss the tools and processes that are available to help you with that installation. The WebCast will also review some of the common issues that Microsoft hears in calls to PSS. Other topics will include how to apply updates and how to troubleshoot problems. The WebCast will also provide information about related articles. .

How to Lock Down a Windows 2000 Terminal Server Session
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 278295 - You can use Group Policies to lock down a Terminal Server session on a Windows 2000-based computer. With the following settings, even the administrator account will have restricted access. 

How to Manually Add a Redirected Client Printer Using Terminal Services
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 243552 - This article describes how to manually add a client-attached printer to your Terminal Services session.

How to Minimize Graphics Use with Terminal Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 226931 - The use of animated graphics can slow the screen refresh rate on a Terminal Server client. Minimize the use of animated graphics within programs and the operating system whenever possible.

HOW TO: Modify Process Scheduling in Windows 2000 Terminal Services 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 243200 - Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server is designed to have client sessions perform as workstations. Because of this, the administrator is unable to configure the process scheduling of a server. This is no longer the case when you use Windows 2000 Terminal Services. Windows 2000 Terminal Services default settings are based on whether the terminal server is in application or remote administration mode. Application servers default to having the Applications option enabled, and remote administration servers default to having the Background Services option enabled. These settings are configurable, and they are part of the Application Response Performance options

How to Print to a Local Network Printer in Terminal Services
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 286047 - You may find that you cannot print to a local network printer from a Windows 2000 Server-based computer running Terminal Services. This happens when the client and server are in separate, unconnected domains.

How to Run the Terminal Services Licensing Tool from Another Computer
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 263315 - You may want to run the Terminal Services Licensing tool from another Windows 2000 client, for remote administration or troubleshooting purposes. This article describes how to do this. 

HOW TO: Secure Communication Between a Client and Server with Terminal Services Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 306561 - This step-by-step article describes how to secure communications between a client computer and a server by using Windows 2000 Terminal Services. 

HOW TO: Securely Copy and Paste Files Between the Terminal Services Client and the Terminal Server 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 309825 - When you use Windows 2000 Terminal Services, you can run your own dedicated sessions on a Terminal server. You can run the Terminal Services client software to connect to Terminal servers and to run line-of-business programs. you are an administrator, you can use Terminal Services to manage remote computers more easily. This article describes how to securely copy and paste files between the Terminal Services client computer and Terminal server. 

HOW TO: Use the TSKILL Command to End Processes in Windows 2000 Terminal Services  
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 320052 - This step-by-step article describes how to end active processes that are running on a Terminal Services server by using
the tskill command. You can end active processes that are running on a Terminal Services server by right-clicking the processes on the Processes tab in Terminal Services Manager, and then clicking End Process , or by using the tskill command. Note that if you end a process, no notification is sent to the user. The process is immediately ended. Only administrators can use the tskill command to end processes that run in other user sessions. Unless you are logged on as Administrator or as a member of the Administrators group, you can use tskill to end only those processes that belong to you.

HOW TO: Use WinStation Monitor to Monitor Terminal Services Client Sessions 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 320190 - This article describes how to use the WinStation Monitor tool to monitor Terminal Services client sessions. You can use the WinStation Monitor tool (Winsta.exe) to monitor the status of all users who are logged on to a Windows 2000-based Terminal Services

Print Screen Functionality on Terminal Server Client 
The ALT-PRINT SCREEN functionality that pastes a current screen shot to the Clipboard in Windows 95, and Windows NT is not available on the RDP version 4.0 client connecting to a Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server. The functionality is available on the Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition, console.

Optimizing Applications for Windows 2000 Terminal Services and Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server Edition
Microsoft Whitepaper that provides guidelines for ensuring that applications run well under Windows 2000 Terminal Services. It also provides information on enhancing the user experience by tuning the application for the Terminal Services environment and taking advantage of the capabilities that Terminal Services provides. Source: Microsoft.com (Sept 1999)

Printer Redirection Architecture in Windows 2000 Terminal Services 
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 294429 - This article describes how Windows 2000 Terminal Services redirects a client computer's local printer ports.

Removing Additional Permissions Granted to Terminal Services Users
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 238965 - To allow older programs to run correctly under Terminal Services in Windows 2000, additional permissions are granted to Terminal Services users. This article describes how to remove these additional permissions. 

Securing Terminal Server Communications Between Client and Server
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 232514 - This article describes how to enable secure communications between a Terminal Server client and a Windows 2000 server running Terminal Services.

Securing Windows 2000 Terminal Services
The Terminal Services environment is, by definition, a thin-client architecture where all application processing occurs centrally on the server. Therefore, it is important to protect the integrity of the data stored on the Windows 2000 Server as well as the data in transit among the Terminal Services application and its clients. This paper presents the information necessary to implement strong security within your Windows 2000 Terminal Services environment. Source: Microsoft.com

Terminal Server System Font Setting Affects All Clients
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 186558 -
The system setting for font size affects all clients connected to Terminal Server. To ensure that data is displayed correctly on lower resolution monitors, set the font size to small. 

Using Drive Share with Terminal Services
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article: 244725 - You can use the Drive Share tool that is included with the Microsoft Windows 2000 Server Resource Kit to automatically make client disks available in a Terminal Services client session. This tool is only supported on Microsoft Windows NT and Windows 2000 Clients. Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows Millennium Edition clients cannot use this utility. 

 

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