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Windows 2000 MCSE Exam 70-222: 
Migrating from Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows 2000

This certification exam measures your ability to migrate domains from Windows NT 4.0 to Windows 2000 and to perform domain restructures. A migration can include an upgrade only, a restructure only, or an upgrade and a restructure. A migration refers to the changes made to the Windows NT Server 4.0 environment during its promotion to Windows 2000 Server. Migration encompasses two processes: 1) domain upgrade - Windows NT Server 4.0 software is upgraded to Windows 2000 Server on the PDC and some or all of the BDCs 2) domain restructure - Objects in a given domain are relocated to a Windows 2000 domain that either is part of the same forest or belongs to a different forest. Although a further restructure can occur post-migration, a post-migration restructure occurs only in a completely Windows 2000 environment.
Exam Details
Number of Questions 47
Passing Score 687/1000
Time Limit 180 minutes
Difficulty Rating 8/10 
Certifications MCP, MCSE, MCSA
Official Site http://www.microsoft.com/traincert/exams/70-222.asp
Recommended Resources
Exam Objectives:
Developing the Migration Strategy

Select the migration type. Types consist of domain upgrade and restructure, domain upgrade only, and domain restructure only.

Plan migration.
  • Select domains and establish proper order for migrating them.
  • Select destination of migrated objects.
  • Plan for incremental object migrations as appropriate.
  • Develop a pilot migration strategy.
Evaluate the current environment.
  • Evaluate current hardware.
  • Evaluate security implications. Considerations include physical security, delegating control to groups, certificate services, SID history, and evaluating post-migration security risks.
  • Evaluate application compatibility. Considerations include Web server, Microsoft BackOffice products, and line of business (LOB) applications.
  • Evaluate network services, including remote access functionality, networking protocols, DHCP, LAN Manager Replication, WINS, NetBIOS, Windows 2000 DNS Server service, and existing DNS service.

Preparing the Environment for Migration

Create and configure a pristine environment.

Install the Windows 2000 DNS service or configure the existing DNS implementation as appropriate.

Develop and deploy a recovery plan. Consider implications for Security Accounts Manager (SAM), WINS, DHCP, Windows 2000 DNS Server service, and existing DNS service.

Planning and Deploying a Domain Upgrade

Develop a domain upgrade strategy.

Develop an operating system upgrade path. Considerations may include operating system version and service packs.

Upgrade the PDC, BDCs, application servers, DNS servers, and RRAS servers.

Configure networking protocols, DHCP, LAN Manager Replication, WINS, NetBIOS, Windows 2000 DNS Server service, and existing DNS service.

Implement group policies.

Implement file replication bridges.

Convert domains to native mode.

Perform test deployments of domain upgrades.

Implement disaster recovery plans.

  • Restore pre-migration environment.
  • Roll back implementation to a specific point.
Perform post-migration tasks.
  • Back up domains.
  • Verify functionality of network services.

Planning and Deploying an Intra-Forest Domain Restructure and an Inter-Forest Domain Restructure

Develop a domain restructure strategy.

Create or configure the Windows 2000 target domain or domains.

  • Create appropriate trusts.
  • Create organizational units (OUs).
  • Implement a given site design.
  • Implement group policies.
  • Configure remote access functionality, networking protocols, DHCP, LAN Manager Replication, WINS, NetBIOS, Windows 2000 DNS Server service, and existing DNS service.
Select and configure tools, including ADMT, ClonePrincipal, MoveTree, NETDOM, and the Windows 2000 Resource Kit tools.

Migrate global groups and user accounts.

Migrate local groups and computer accounts.

Perform test deployments of intra-forest migrations and inter-forest migrations.

Implement disaster recovery plans.
  • Restore pre-migration environment.
  • Roll back implementation to a specific point.
Perform post-migration tasks.
  • Redefine DACLs.
  • Back up source domains.
  • Decommission source domains and redeploy domain controllers.
  • Verify success of object migrations.
  • Verify functionality of network services.
  • Remove SID history from objects.

Troubleshooting

Troubleshoot a failed domain upgrade.

  • Resolve hardware failures.
  • Resolve third-party tool issues.
  • Resolve issues associated with rights necessary for upgrade.
  • Resolve domain name issues.
Troubleshoot account issues for all types of migrations.
  • Resolve system policy translation failures.
  • Resolve logon script failures.
  • Resolve issues associated with duplicate accounts that have different SIDs.
  • Resolve issues associated with user rights.
Troubleshoot access issues for all types of migrations.
  • Resolve client computer connectivity issues.
  • Resolve permission issues involving NTFS.
  • Resolve issues associated with the inaccessibility and absence of shared resources.
  • Resolve authentication issues.
  • Resolve trust relationship and inappropriate access issues.
Troubleshoot network services problems for all types of migrations.
  • Resolve name resolution issues.
  • Resolve remote access permissions failures and logon failures.
  • Resolve file and directory replication issues.
  • Resolve network service issues, including DHCP, WINS, and DNS.
Troubleshoot application failures for all types of migrations.
  • Resolve incompatibility issues.
  • Resolve issues associated with hard-coded account information in third-party applications.
Troubleshoot tool issues for domain restructures. Considerations include ADMT, ClonePrincipal, NETDOM, MoveTree, and Windows 2000 Resource Kit tools.

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