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Last Updated December 10, 2003

LabMice Link of the Day Archive - June 2002
As we surf the web in our pursuit of additional content for LabMice, we occasionally stumble upon a really cool, humorous, unusual, or very useful link that we think should stand out from the hundreds we add every week. So we developed a small section on our front page to highlight these, and will archive the rest here.
 
This Month:

Server Memory - Of course it's expensive
Prices may have come down for desktop memory, but server memory modules (which are often proprietary) are often 5 times more expensive. Is the cost justified, or are we just being gouged by the industry? Source: The Register

Building Your Network: Making Career Connections
What you know is crucial to your IT career, but who you know is just as beneficial. Our professional networking tips will help you make the most of any meeting. Source: CertMag

Is VoIP vulnerable?
As companies increasingly replace aging PBXs with IP telephony equipment, they are uncovering a host of security issues that might not have applied to old-world phone technology. Source: Network World Fusion

Should Microsoft Be Held Liable for Defective Software?
Microsoft, the largest software company, is probably responsible for more software vulnerabilities than any other company in the world. And although we've been dealing with©and in many cases cursing©the steadily increasing number of problems with Microsoft's software, the company's customers have done little to address the problems. Until now, that is. Source: Windows & .NET Magazine

Annoyances.org
Annoyances.org is the most complete collection of tips, patches, and workarounds assembled for and by actual users of Microsoft Windows. Sections include Customizing, Networking, Performance, and Troubleshooting for Windows 9x, Windows 2000, and Windows XP. The Windows Annoyances book series is based in part on this site's material.

Top Ten Ways to Trash your laptop
As the UK©s number one laptop insurer Complete Computer Cover has decided to highlight the most bizarre ways in which people have managed to destroy their machines beyond all repair.
This page is complete with some photo re-enactments and a short video.

XP Professional Security Features: An Introduction
This is not intended to be exhaustive dissertation of all the new features in XP; rather, the purpose is to highlight some of the new security features found in the product, and to provide those still considering an upgrade to XP with some insight into how doing so can help them administer their network. Source: SecurityFocus

Security Patching for IIS
ComputerWorld's Dan Verton recently reported on an interesting study titled "Constant Security Fixes Overwhelming IT Managers." The study found that the number of security patches and updates is overwhelming IT staffs and, as a result, IT staffs are falling behind and, in some cases, deliberately not applying patches because the bandwidth to do so isn't available. Downtime from applying patches and rebooting servers only makes the problem worse Source: SecurityAdministrator

The five deadly sins of unused software
Companies spend too much money on software to see it turn into 'shelfware'. Here are five ways to make sure that you use all the software you buy -- and that you don't buy what you can't use. Source: Darwin

Security on a Shoestring
Cash-strapped IT departments can turn to freeware security tools for robust access control, intrusion detection, content filtering and more. Source: Information Security Magazine

Microsoft redesigns MCP exam guides
Microsoft has begun republishing some exam prep guides in a new format that is designed to offer candidates more useful training and MCP exam preparation information. Microsoft is also asking for feedback in order to improve these and future guides. To submit feedback, please send e-mail to mcpf@microsoft.com with ©Prep guide feedback? in the subject line

Securing the Home Front
Looking for a quick and efficient way to keep up with security patches for your home network? Believe it or not, a broadband connection might be the answer. Source: Connected Home Magazine

The Commoner's Virus
Despite its virulence, the Klez worm is ignored by the newspapers and dismissed by the digerati. Could the demographics of its victims be a factor? Source: SecurityFocus

MS Turns Up Heat on Warezed WinXP Copies
The beta of Service Pack 1 for Windows XP has now shipped to testers and it declines to install if you're using a leaked WinXP license key. So far, people using copies of Windows XP that have been activated using one of the leaked keys have had no trouble getting patches and updates because Windows Update didn't check the validity of their license. Source: The Register

How to manage and prevent 'insider' attacks
Most computer attacks come from the outside, but the costliest ones are inside jobs. Here's how to manage the risk without making honest employees feel like crooks. Source: CIO.com

Dead Men Tell No Passwords
The man in charge of some of Norway's most precious electronic documents died without divulging the way to access them. A plea to hackers to help crack the system is out. Source: Wired

Roll-up Patching
What's the difference between a hotfix, security update patch, cumulative patch and security roll-up patch?  Source: Information Security Magazine

Read The F***ing Story, Then RTFM
Nobody reads product manuals. Well, some people do. Some cultures even love them. But woe unto the company that tries to shovel its documentation into another language. Source: Wired

Microsoft Finds Upgrade Plan A Tough Sell
Despite a looming deadline, business IT buyers have yet to embrace Microsoft's new software licensing program, which gives customers discounts for signing longer contracts. Some doubt the program will save them money, while others want to keep the door open to cheaper choices such as Linux. Source: Information Week


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